Celebrating World Refugee Day

first_img Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL World Refugee Day Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Celebrating World Refugee Day Diocese of Olympia Refugee Resettlement Office shares Abel’s success story AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate Diocese of Nebraska This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Refugees Migration & Resettlement, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Advocacy Peace & Justice, Press Release Service Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Shreveport, LA center_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Featured Events Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Albany, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Diocese of Olympia] For young people like Abel, a 24-year old refugee from Eritrea, the prospect of starting from scratch in a new society on his own hit him suddenly. “You know, I think all people want to make success. But we struggle, all of us do. That was what I realized right away. That maybe I needed a little help,” Abel said.Thankfully for these energetic newcomers, the Refugee Resettlement Office (RRO) provides support through Individual Development Accounts (or IDAs). IDAs are like starter kits for low-income working refugees who are saving money to build assets – home purchases, business start-ups, or post-secondary or technical degrees. Provided they complete a financial literacy course and a savings plan agreement, participants will receive a one-to-one grant match of their savings that is committed toward their asset-building goal.Despite working full-time at SeaTac International Airport – a two hour daily bus commute from his residence in Shoreline, Washington – Abel showed a willingness to challenge himself further and reach for new goals. Last year, he signed up for evening classes at Seattle’s Evergreen Truck Driving School, which provides would-be freight operators with hands on training to pass the Washington state Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) exam. By signing up for the Diocese of Olympia’s IDA program, Abel got the opportunity to receive a grant that covered half the cost of tuition for the six-month long course.“The class was very helpful. And it prepared me for what I needed to do next,” Abel said, smiling. “Start my own business.Completing his IDA account gave Abel important benefits. For one, finishing the CDL course gave him the knowledge and skills he needed to succeed in a career in freight operation. Second, the financial discipline that he earned through completing his IDA savings plan gave him convenient entry into the diocesan micro-enterprise loan program. Since 2003, the RRO has managed a diocesan loan fund that, with help from RRO, allows qualified applicants to borrow micro-loans towards start-up businesses. Abel eagerly completed the required business planning coursework, credit counseling sessions, and market research offered by diocesan staff, becoming eligible for a $5,000 loan. Within a month of finishing his CDL course, he had already managed to get his trucking business off the ground, using his loan to invest in an FC2 Freightliner truck.“I found a for-hire company in Seattle. So I’m ready to work for the Port (of Seattle), and anyone else,” Abel says laughing, standing beside his new truck.While Abel’s example shows what great feats can be accomplished through an individual’s initiative to succeed, he is quick to give credit to the support he received from others. “All of the classes I took (at the Diocese of Olympia) really helped me – helped me to understand financial problems and the business world, and to spend my money the right way. And of course the grant, which gave me my education. So I’m just very thankful for all of the help I can get.”For more information on the programs offered by the Refugee Resettlement Office visit http://www.dioceserroseattle.org/ or call (206) 323-3152, or email [email protected] In addition to the IDA and micro-enterprise programs mentioned above, the RRO also offers programs and information on resettlement, immigration, English as a Second Language classes, employment assistance, citizenship classes, business training, financial literacy training, and STARS training.— Kevin deVoss is a business development specialist in the Diocese of Olympia Refugee Resettlement Office. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By Kevin deVossPosted Jun 20, 2014 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

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Western NC’s Kairos West: Intentionally sacred among the secular

first_img Rector Tampa, FL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest By Pat McCaughanPosted Jun 19, 2015 Kairos West Community Center in Asheville, North Carolina, is a one-year-old church-in-the-world initiative of the Cathedral of All Souls in Asheville and the Diocese of Western North Carolina. The ministry, based in a former fabric store on increasingly gentrified Hayward Road in West Asheville, received a Mission Enterprise Zone grant. Photo: Kairos West Community Center via FacebookEditor’s note: This is the second in a series of stories about The Episcopal Church’s pledge at the 77th General Convention to partner with dioceses to begin innovative mission strategies. Previous stories are here.[Episcopal News Service] Any given day or night, the Kairos West Community Center hosts people interested in “funky fitness” classes, artists, musicians, those living with traumatic brain injury and others exploring their gender assignment, as well as those seeking conversation, free Wi-Fi, coffee and pastries, fresh produce, spiritual sustenance and worship.Located in increasingly gentrified West Asheville, the one-year-old center is a church-in-the-world initiative of the Cathedral of All Souls and the Diocese of Western North Carolina. It was partially funded by a 2014 Mission Enterprise Zone grant from The Episcopal Church.Mission Enterprise Zones and their companion New Church Starts are Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society initiatives funded through the 2013-2015 Five Marks of Mission triennial budget, approved by General Convention July 2012. In the budget, $2 million was allotted for the work of establishing Mission Enterprise Zones and for supporting new church starts for the first of the Anglican Communion’s Five Marks of Mission: to proclaim the Good News of the Kingdom.(The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)Matching grants were available for up to $20,000 for a Mission Enterprise Zone and up to $100,000 for new church starts. The Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on Local Mission and Ministry Committee considered applications for the grants and recommended to council which ought to be approved.For Joy, 53, who is homeless and shows up most mornings to help set out coffee and pastries for guests, it is a place finally to belong.“I dropped in one day and it was a refuge; a nice community of people trying to help each other here,” she said. “It’s great, because there’s coffee and tea and I get on-line. I get to use the computer to communicate with friends because I don’t have a phone.”Located on the active Haywood Road business strip, the center “is not commercial or materialistic,” said Joy, who asked that her last name be withheld. “It’s nice that it’s here on this street among restaurants and businesses, because it’s not about money. It’s not about what you just bought or anything like that.“It’s about your emotional and spiritual well-being. It’s just about coming in and people being themselves and for that to be okay for them, to be themselves.”Kairos West Community Center’s regular potluck is a place for neighbors to network and collaborate. The center is in West Asheville, North Carolina. Photo: Kairos West Community Center via Facebook“West Asheville is changing,” said the Rev. Milly Morrow, canon missioner for the cathedral. “It used to be a poverty-stricken area that was thriving in the sense of the capacity of the community there.“Then one great restaurant opened up and the New York Times covered it and boom, a flood of businesses came in right on this one street and the economy went nuts. Prices went up. It was like Gentrification 101, with folks living in the neighborhood getting pushed back further,” Morrow told ENS.The Rev. James Lee, associate pastor at St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church, a Kairos West partner, credited Morrow “with the great idea of having a center that does church but not in a traditional sense of doing it … of sharing the love of Christ without the stained glass windows and steeple.”‘Church, 24/7’Morrow credits the center’s inspiration on a visit to its namesake, Kairos Cuba, a community center in Matanzas, about 50 miles south of Havana. While on pilgrimage to Cuba, she and a group of cathedral youth and adults visited the center, which is “right on the main street. They have a cistern with clean water and beds for pilgrims and a worship space and do art and liturgy.“They keep the front doors open all the time and people come in and out for water,” she said. “Neighbors meet and discuss what’s happening in their neighborhoods and their families and the changing life in Cuba. Together, they are coming up with solutions and energizing each other and building the capacity of the community to thrive.”She realized that, “this is church, 24/7. It seemed effortless,” Morrow recalled. ”It was about being together. It wasn’t programmatic. It wasn’t strategic. It was relationship.”After she returned to West Asheville, the memory of Kairos Cuba “couldn’t let go of me,” she said. “It just kept hovering right over every other work I was doing and was ultimately linked with this vision I had about this community center.”She connected with local pastors and it quickly came together.A fabric store on Haywood Road went out of business;Morrow was able to lease the space with assistance from the $20,000 Mission Enterprise Zone grant, which an equal amount to be previously pledged by the diocese.Western North Carolina Bishop Porter Taylor said the diocese matched the Mission Enterprise Zone grant through an endowment earmarked for innovative ministries and their operating budgets because Kairos West aims to meet a segment of West Asheville’s population that “longs to be fed but is not coming to church to be fed.“Instead of trying to get people to come to church, she (Morrow) is taking the church to the people,” he said.“Kairos West is important to us because we believe that we can’t afford to lose this whole generation, not so much to The Episcopal Church, but to the good news of Jesus Christ and she is able to be with people where they are and connect them to the good news in a way that makes sense to them.”Additionally, the center “has really energized the diocese and has also inspired other parishes to explore creative ministries,” Taylor said. “It’s had a ripple effect.”Receiving the grants was “amazing; for the church being willing to say, this is what we do. We send people out into the world to start new things, to help communities flourish, this is what we want to be about,” Morrow said.After Kairos West opened, for the first few weeks, she waited inside, “wondering what am I doing? And then people started trickling in, saying ‘what are you doing’ and I’d say ‘we’re working on mercy and justice and here’s our mission and do you want to participate?’”Within several months, a diverse group of at least 15 “commerce-free” ministries began using the space, free of charge, Morrow said. In turn, they offer gatherings free of charge and they do not receive payment for the work they do at the center.They commit to core values of decreasing competition and isolation, and increasing collaboration and connectivity in order to help “invite the Holy Spirit into our work more and more and more. That’s what we hear Jesus asking us to do, be connected.”The Rev. Milly Morrow had the “great idea,” a colleague says, of “sharing the love of Christ without the stained glass windows and steeple.” Kairos West Community Center is located in a former fabric store in West Asheville, North Carolina. Photo: Kairos West Community Center via FacebookMorrow is one of those people who knows how to listen well to the people who historically have been underrepresented or even unrepresented in The Episcopal Church, said the Rev. Tom Brackett, the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society’s missioner for church planting and ministry redevelopment. (The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society is the legal and canonical name under which The Episcopal Church is incorporated, conducts business and carries out mission.)Morrow and similar practitioners ask people who have been in the community a long time to tell them what the needs are in the community that are not being met but that could be engaged immediately and who are or who might be allies in that work, Brackett said.“The shape of ministry development that emerges from their style really, truly is organic; based on lots of conversation, and while they are very capable of coming up with strategy and getting allies to help them with great strategy, they have chosen to listen,” Brackett told ENS.And, he added invoking the Williams Stafford poem The Way it Is, Morrow knows how to pull the thread of her ministry through all of her encounters.“So, she has endless stories of how she said yes to one person that led her to another person that led to a new opportunity,” Brackett said.Janet Hurley’s nonprofit agency, Asheville Writers and Schools in Community, has a huge mission but not much office space. The program, which connects writers and teaching artists with teachers, classrooms and community programs, frequently holds board meetings at Kairos West.“It’s very welcoming,” Hurley said. “There are poetry workshops, peer counselors who meet with a mental health group. They can drop in and see the counselors, a lot of different folks use the space for a variety of different reasons,” said Hurley, who also serves as a volunteer host, setting out pastries, making coffee, and greeting guests.“You end up having conversations and making connections,” she said. “It has a the-sum –is-greater-than-its-parts-feel to it. I bring my laptop to do some work and if people stop by, there’s always a sign out front that they can come in and have coffee and tea. There are children’s books and games. The other day while I was there hosting, two young women came in and played Pictionary.”‘Ministering without really ministering’Lee, from St. Paul’s Missionary Baptist Church, grew up in West Asheville and has witnessed gentrification shift the largely African American community and his congregation into more of “a mixed community, a multicultural church.”An early collaborator with Morrow and Kairos West, he calls it a beacon among the area’s economic explosion. “It’s a great way of ministering without really ministering in the sense of having the bible ready and saying that this is a bible study or prayer meeting.”“There’s a lot of hurt with the church and the traditions of the church,” he added. “It’s a way of introducing those traditions in a different manner to make it more receptive and hopefully bring someone back to the body of the church.”Painting is a regular practice at Kairos West Community Center in West Asheville, North Carolina. Photo: Kairos West Community Center via FacebookHe recalled referring someone to the center for spiritual support who “was ecstatic to have someone listen to him without judgment, with conviction, offer a prayer for him. That’s a phenomenal experience of how to do church without looking like a church.”A donation of books about social justice helped to form a library; comfortable couches and chairs lend a living room feel. A children’s nook with games and bean bag chairs, art tables and supplies and a computer plug-in counter space help create “the intentional sacred space in a secular world set apart for the building of capacity of community through art, liturgy and service,” Morrow said.Also available are spiritual direction and counseling, yoga classes, free farmer’s markets and free food markets, “which help because in West Asheville there’s no free food, so we go and pick up extra food and hand it out,” she said.Recently, a group of twentysomethings “who love church and love liturgy … wanted to give thanks to God for everything that God’s doing here” began a Wednesday evening worship collective. It incorporates Taizé chant, prayers, Scripture, music, silence, classical literature excerpts, and “we’ll see where it goes,” Morrow said.Lee, 36, has held bible study and prayer meetings at the center and says Kairos West offers a variety of ways in which “people can experience Christ in a different manner than they probably would on Sunday morning.“I’ve seen the way it’s pulled together church across denominations, across racial lines, across socioeconomic classes,” he added. “It’s been able to allow people to exist as God has intended us to exist, with peace and harmony and justice.”Morrow said she regrets, however, not ensuring greater diversity, making sure “it is multi-voiced, and not just the people who have interests. I said, okay, who’s interested? Instead, I should have said who’s really needed at the table?“My definition of interest was very white, very middle class,” she added. “I didn’t do a great job of designing a place for intersectional ministry that I really have a longing for, a growing edge, I need to learn more about that.”While the center offers a much-needed presence and helps the community’s capacity to thrive, Morrow considers it “a moment in time; an explosion in the best way possible.“It is gifting me,” she added. “I am a better person because it exists. Everybody that walks into the space gains some empowerment from it.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments are closed. Rector Martinsville, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID General Convention, Rector Washington, DC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Tags Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (1) Rector Albany, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Featured Events Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis June 24, 2015 at 10:03 pm “…and others exploring their gender assignment.”Gender assignment.We’ve run so far off the rails. I don’t see how the Episcopal Church can survive this sort of nonsense. Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Frank Brown says: Mission Enterprise Zones Rector Pittsburgh, PA Western NC’s Kairos West: Intentionally sacred among the secular Rector Bath, NC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME General Convention 2015, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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VIDAS responds to need in Puerto Rico

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Lynette Wilson Posted Aug 20, 2015 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit an Event Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 VIDAS responds to need in Puerto Rico Island faces drought, entrenched economic crisis Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit a Press Release Press Release Service Latin America, Associate Rector Columbus, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Tampa, FL AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Albany, NY center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI A teacher helps a child make a green handprint outside a classroom. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENS[Episcopal News Service – San Juan, Puerto Rico] Tucked behind the Epsicopal Diocese of Puerto Rico’s administrative offices in Trujillo Alto, an increasingly mixed income municipality within metropolitan San Juan, sits Centro San Justo, a two-story education and childcare center serving 140 students aged 2 months to 5 years old.Centro San Justo, or Saint Just Center, operates 50 weeks a year from 6 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., an accommodating schedule that allows working parents, many of whom single mothers, a flexible, holistic childcare option. Saint Just is part of VIDAS, Episcopal Social Services, Inc., the social services arm of the Diocese of Puerto Rico, which seeks to respond to the needs of individuals and families offering integrated services aimed at providing a better quality of life.The diocese has a long history of providing health and social services on the island, and continues to grow and expand its services in what is a critical time in Puerto Rico.In recent years, Puerto Rico, a U.S. territory whose residents are American citizens, has experienced record outward migration in recent years owing to an entrenched recession dating to 2006 and its complicated economic relationship with the United States. In recent months, Puerto Rico’s $72 billion debt crisis and its inability to declare bankruptcy because of its territorial status has repeatedly made headlines and drawn comparisons with Greece. In early August, the first time in its history, Puerto Rico defaulted on its payment to bondholders.“Three hundred thousand people have left,” said Bishop Wilfrido Ramos Orench, who became the diocese’s provisional bishop in March 2014.On Aug. 8, Ramos issued a letter calling on the churches to come together to address the economic crisis, calling it the worst economic and social crisis since the Great Depression of the 1930s. The letter gives a brief overview of Puerto Rico’s economic history beginning with World War II and ending with the 2005 expiration of a section of Internal Revenue Code that offered U.S.-based companies federal tax exemptions on income earned in Puerto Rico.  Congress enacted the exemption in 1976 to increase economic development.“In this moment, it’s clearer than ever, that we are experiencing a serious structural crisis in our neoliberal economic model,” wrote Ramos in the letter. “Our economy is not growing, it’s stagnant. The country has accumulated a large amount of public debt and does not have the capacity to collect the funds necessary to pay it.“The response of our government has been to reduce public services, impose regressive taxes and use the retirement funds of public employees. The Puerto Rican government’s credit worthiness is practically null. They are predicting serious crises in healthcare services, the retirement system and a possible government shutdown.”Regarding the letter and churches responding to the crisis, “this is where we need to be,” he said, during an interview with Episcopal News Service Aug. 12.Added to that, more immediately, a severe drought has the San Juan metropolitan area, including Trujillo Alto, rationing water. Many residents have water one day and then go for two days without. Saint Just Center, explained the Rev. Ana R. Mendez, the center’s director who also serves as the associate program director for VIDAS, is operating under a state of emergency and dependent on a cistern.The government of Puerto Rico provides financial support to the childcare cente to aid its efforts to provide assistance, education and transformational opportunities to children and their families. In May, Saint Just received a certificate of excellence in recognition of its work and commitment to boys and girls from the Administration for Care and Development of Children.Carla Rodriguez volunteers at Saint Just Center 20 hours per week. VIDAS depends on volunteers to provide services. Photo: Lynette Wilson/ENSMost of the school’s students come from broken homes, where women have suffered high rates of domestic violence, where one or more parent may be incarcerated, and in some cases grandmothers are raising their grandchildren.“The most beautiful thing is the transformation of the children and the family, complete transformation,” said Mendez, in an interview with ENS in her office.It was Mendez, a longtime educator ordained an Episcopal priest seven years ago, who saw a need in Loíza, a small, impoverished town on Puerto Rico’s northeast coast, where she serves Misión Santiago y San Felipe, for a program to prepare pregnant teenage girls for motherhood and economic independence, and to educate other teens on the prevention of pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases. She founded Canciones de Cuna in 2009.In addition to Canciones de Cuna and Saint Just, the largest childcare center, VIDAS operates three additional childcare centers and Hogar San Miguel, a home for runaways.In September, the diocese will break ground in Ponce, with the help of a $250,000 grant from singer Marc Anthony’s foundation, on a facility that will allow it to expand its services to homeless teens.– Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Province IX Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Job Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Schools aspire to reach out to refugees

first_img Rector Martinsville, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Refugees Migration & Resettlement Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Schools aspire to reach out to refugees Rector Albany, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Washington, DC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Anglican Communion, Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Tampa, FL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Students from Samuel Marsden Collegiate School in Karori, Wellington, pray for Syrian refugees. Photo: Anglican Taonga[Anglican Communion News Service] Students from Anglican schools throughout the province of Aotearoa, New Zealand & Polynesia have prayed through the night as part of a 24-hour vigil for the refugees streaming out from Syria across Europe, and into camps in Jordan and Lebanon.The event has been given the name ASPiRe – Anglican Schools Praying for Refugees – and is being supported by a Facebook page.Students took turns, an hour at a time, “to pray for Syrians fleeing the hell that has engulfed their homeland,” a provincial spokesman said. The students began their prayer-work at 3pm local time on 15 October and kept the vigil through the night, stopping at 3pm local time on Friday 16 October.“Hundreds of them are taking part,” the spokesman said. “Dilworth, for example, had more than 100 of its students, across its three Auckland campuses, keeping vigil between 3am and 6am this morning, and more than 100 boarders at King’s College took part, too.“They embraced sacrifice. For example, the kids at Basden College in Suva and All Saints School in Labasa put up their hands for the graveyard shift, and prayed from midnight to 2am; while St Margaret’s College in Christchurch has young women praying through the whole 24 hours.”The students used a variety of prayer techniques, including praying in silence, in sing together, and in intercession. They have prayer-walked, lit candles, and they have written letters and cards of support to kids their own age who’ve been swept up in the Syrian maelstrom.“Anne van Gend, the director of the Anglican Schools Office in the Province, has undertaken to gather up those heart-warming messages and have them distributed by an aid organisation which is working in the refugee camps in Jordan.The students have also used their allotted times to compose “prayer chains” – prayers written on interlinked loops of card – which will soon be strung around Wellington’s Cathedral of St Paul.“It is so inspiring and encouraging to see this support from our schools,” the Archbishop of New Zealand, the Most Revd Philip Richardson, said. “As a church we are working hard to demonstrate to our government that as a country we can take many more refugees than the small number currently agreed to.“The largest movement of refugees since the Second World War demands a generous response from us.”In a statement, the Archbishop thanked the students for their “wonderful contribution to this work.”The Bishop of Dunedin, the Rt Revd Kelvin Wright, has responded to criticism on social media from people who have said that “prayer is not enough.”“I doubt that any one of these remarkable young [people] would disagree with you,” he said. “The point of prayer is, firstly, to change the person praying.“Each one of them has got up in the middle of the night and spent an hour in the presence of that which they hold most sacred thinking in a concentrated manner about the issue… Their own and others thinking has been changed by tonight’s event…“And in the long run who is most likely to take effective action to solve difficult problems? Those… who pray? Or those who doubt?” Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Posted Oct 19, 2015 Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Smithfield, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Job Listing Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

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Canada: Synod’s council approves plans to enable same-sex marriage discussion

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tags Cathedral Dean Boise, ID New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By André ForgetPosted Nov 21, 2016 Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Human Sexuality, Same-Sex Marriage [Anglican Journal] On Nov. 20, Council of General Synod passed four resolutions related to how it will deal with the resolution to change the marriage canon to allow same-sex marriage in the triennium before General Synod 2019. Full article. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Canada: Synod’s council approves plans to enable same-sex marriage discussion TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NY Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Events This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NYlast_img read more

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Bishop of Polynesia addresses festivalgoers in England on climate change

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Events Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Submit a Press Release The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate Diocese of Nebraska Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Bishop of Polynesia addresses festivalgoers in England on climate change Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Environment & Climate Change Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Posted Sep 1, 2017 Rector Bath, NC Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Advocacy Peace & Justice, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit an Event Listing TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab [Anglican Taonga] Archbishop Winston Halapua of Polynesia has taken his concerns about climate justice and his moana theology message to a new stage – to the immaculate grounds of a stately hall in the English midlands. He’d been invited by the United Society Partners in the Gospel (USPG) to be their keynote speaker at the Greenbelt Festival, which was held in the grounds of Boughton House. The Greenbelt Festival has been a British fixture for more than four decades and its organisers say their mission is “to create spaces, like festivals, where art, faith and justice collide.”Read the full article here. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Press Release Servicelast_img read more

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To boil or not? Lobster fundraisers raise ethical questions

first_img September 25, 2017 at 10:21 am I am a member of “peta” — People eating Tasty Animals. Rector Belleville, IL Submit an Event Listing [Episcopal News Service] People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has called for vegan bake sales instead of lobster boil fundraisers, but some Episcopalians are finding the request a bit tough to swallow.Melissa Mary Wilson, coordinator for the Christian outreach division of PETA, called for an end to the popular fundraisers in a late August letter to Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry.Noting that Sept. 25 is National Lobster Day, Wilson said at least 17 Episcopal churches from Maine to Maryland to Mississippi, “collectively kill more than 10,000 lobsters annually.”While Francine Sabisch, parish administrator at St. Peter’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church in Swansboro, North Carolina, generally supports PETA, she disagrees with the effort.A Maine native, she said lobster boils are “part of life, part of the culture” there and elsewhere, and not just for churches but also for many local municipalities and other groups.The church’s annual Lobsterfest took place on Sept. 16, raising about $7,300. The proceeds will go to local agencies and most probably for flood relief for those impacted by recent hurricanes.“In previous years, we’ve helped Backpack Buddies, and two different women’s shelters. Every year, we help out the literacy council,” Sabisch said.The funds raised have also benefited worker-retraining programs, hospice centers, boys and girls clubs, wounded warrior projects and animal rescue organizations, and have helped purchase new band equipment for local high schools, she added.St. Peter’s by-the-Sea Church in Swansboro, North Carolina, uses the proceeds of its annual Lobsterfest to benefit local community groups. Photo: St. Peter’sThe lobsters typically weigh about 1.5 pounds; the church sells them for $18 to $21, depending on current market price and whether they are cooked or uncooked, she said. This year the church sold about 700, and has set a goal to sell 1,000 next year.“Everyone is very conscientious,” Sabisch said. “Everyone who is involved in handling God’s creatures. We will do everything as humanely as possible.”LAMBS, or “Least Among My Brothers and Sisters,” is PETA’s Christian education division. Its name was “inspired by the verse in Matthew 25:40 in which Jesus tells his followers that whenever you show kindness to those in most need, it’s as if you’re doing that kindness as unto Jesus himself,” said Ben Williamson, PETA’s senior international media director, in an email to Episcopal News Service.“With so few legal protections, lobsters and other animals are truly ‘the least’ among us — and in dire need of our compassion and mercy,” Williamson said.PETA believes one popular method of cooking — boiling the lobsters — is cruel. “Most of us grew up believing that killing lobsters and other animals for food is what must be done, but if we contemplate it, all killing requires conquering, violence and separating ourselves from the rest of creation,” PETA wrote to the presiding bishop. “God designed humans to be caretakers, not killers.”Curry was unavailable for comment, but Episcopal Church spokeswoman Neva Rae Fox said: “PETA has presented an interesting point but local congregations are the decision-makers for their events.”Williamson said LAMBS researchers compiled a list from an Internet search of church lobster events, many of which state the number of lobsters involved at each event. “The list accounts for at least 10,800 lobsters at 17 churches,” he said. “There are likely at least another 1,000 from five churches who gave vague responses.”He added: “We would encourage anyone and everyone to reflect on their own attitudes about causing unnecessary suffering, and move towards a plant-based diet for their health, for the sake of the environment, and because it’s the right thing to do.”PETA specifically cited St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church in Greenville, North Carolina. According to the church website, the church has sold more than 65,000 lobsters since the fundraisers began in 1978. Yearly, the effort has raised as much as $20,000 to benefit the local community.PETA’s invitation raises important ethical questions, not only for Episcopalians, but all Christians, to wrestle with the way faith informs their daily lives and decisions, according to the Rev. John Porter-Acee, a priest in the Diocese of East Carolina.“It is our call as Christians to try to reduce suffering in the world,” said Porter-Acee, a former environmental educator. “Every choice we make is a choice to pursue our faith in one way or another, and to think about investments and fundraisers and food choices as opportunities to decrease the amount of suffering in the world and to support entities that have that goal as well.”But the issue is a complicated one. “If you’re going to do a fundraiser and encourage people to contribute and support it as a suffering-free fundraiser, perhaps one year instead of everybody buying lobster, they buy sweet potatoes,” Porter-Acee said. “But I don’t think we’ll raise $20,000 to benefit the community.”Additionally, sweet potatoes — and other vegetables for that matter — are grown and tended by migrant workers who are not treated very well, “so there is a lot of suffering around vegetables, too.”John McAteer, an ethics faculty member of the Episcopal Diocese of San Diego’s School for Ministry, said that Episcopalians generally consider vegetarianism a matter of personal conscience, “but it is not something theologians and ethicists have come to consensus about.”The issue PETA raises about lobster boil fundraisers essentially involves such questions as whether or not it is possible to “torture” a lobster “or whether they are below the level of sentience that gives them that sort of ethical status. In other words, is it unethical to eat lobsters?”While lobsters seem to react when placed into pots of boiling water and try to crawl out, “their brains aren’t developed enough to know what a pot is or understand that they need to crawl out,” he said. The question of whether crustaceans feel pain has been the subject of much research.“PETA is against eating any animal, so I don’t think it is really about lobsters for them,” McAteer said. “If we stopped having lobster boils, they would come at us for having barbecues next.”The organization has asked U.S. Roman Catholic bishops to end the practice of Lenten fish fries. It has also called Christians to a “ham-free” Easter.“Ethically speaking, there is a much better case for eating lobster than for eating pork, beef or even chicken,” McAteer said. “Unless you’re a full-on vegetarian, then I don’t think a lobster boil should cause you any ethical problem.”— The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. September 23, 2017 at 10:15 pm PETA takes things too far. This is one example for me. Eating meat is not in itself bad. It’s when we do it irresponsibly that it becomes a problem.And yes, Jesus’s first followers were FISHERMEN! Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Jan Robitscher says: September 22, 2017 at 8:26 pm As a church, we have many more issues to worry aboutI appreciate the concern but as I remember, Jesus broke bread with the Apostles.They were fisherman! What is next? Maybe the pore defenselessWine grapes? Let’s get back to saving souls. September 22, 2017 at 5:29 pm Really? Big bugs with barely a nervous system don’t care. Sheesh… Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem September 22, 2017 at 5:13 pm Yep – just as people justified vivisection for years (because animals didn’t feel pain) and cosmetics companies and producers of consumer goods still justify invasive testing of animals on, I guess, the same rationale. It’s part of some cultures to make a money sport of animals fighting each other to the death. Would that be okay for churches if the proceeds were used for good causes? I expect the church to make decisions based on more sensitive criteria than “it’s part of our culture” and “everybody does it” and “there’s no clear consensus in the scientific world…”. The fact that many scientists, theologians and ethicists have concluded that animals, including crustaceans, clearly feel pain and can suffer should, at the least, require critical, focused thinking on our part. By Pat McCaughanPosted Sep 22, 2017 September 22, 2017 at 5:13 pm So when are we going to worry about the lost souls?We done seem to focus on what we are called to do but instead, what is politically correct.Where is our leadership and when will those who publish this stuff going to focus on things that we are called to do. Rector Knoxville, TN Jeffrey Cox says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Smithfield, NC Sr. Dawna Clare Sutton, CG says: September 22, 2017 at 7:08 pm Personally, I do not agree with PETA about Lobsters and I will continue to enjoy them or shrimp, and other kinds of fish. I am not interested in being a vegetarian, but I do eat lots of them along with my fish and meat and ham. What I do is thank God for her gracious bounty, and mother earth for her gift of food and I thank the Lobster/fish/mammal for being there to nourish us. You PETA and others individuals might watch “Avatar” for another way of looking at us all being part of the whole even the fish and mammals that we eat. It is all in one’s personal perspective. I appreciate and respect your perspective, please respect and appreciate mine. Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Kevin Miller says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN To boil or not? Lobster fundraisers raise ethical questions Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Arthur E. House says: September 22, 2017 at 5:01 pm Someone once asked (and I never forgot)–But what about the screaming vegetables? Yes, even plants feel pain. We were created omnivores and we need food to live and anything we eat will cause pain somewhere along the food chain. I am much more concerned about over-fishing. September 24, 2017 at 3:52 pm This is not a carefully thought out theological position but I do remember being told once that “the Land of milk and honey” was so-called because milk and honey are the only two foods that can be harvested without killing something. Even plants must be killed in order to be eaten. So, if we are going to use the criteria of avoiding killing foods to eat them, we’ll be living on milk and honey – not my idea of a balanced diet!! As I said, this is not a well considered theological or ethical position, merely an observation — Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET P.J. Cabbiness says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events Scott McDonald says: September 22, 2017 at 4:48 pm As the lobster…. Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA September 22, 2017 at 4:48 pm I meant…ask the lobster…. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Washington, DC Paul Tunkle says: Jeffrey Cox says: john Williamson says: September 26, 2017 at 5:12 pm “Arise, Peter; slay and eat.” Comments are closed. September 23, 2017 at 10:44 am I am glad someone is considering ALL God’s creatures. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Louise Bower says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Angela Bocage Gilden says: September 26, 2017 at 3:23 pm Jesus distributed loaves and FISHES. Peter and Andrew were FISHermen, and on at least one occasion, our Lord intervened to make a great catch for them. After His resurrection, Jesus ate FISH to show that he was alive in bodily form.The fact that this nonsense about lobsters is even considered sufficiently newsworthy to appear in an ENS release shows again how a once revered and universal church continues to slide into an ever greater chasm of socio-political hysterics. Social Justice for lobsters?God bless the good people who take those creatures, and offer the proceeds of their bounty to causes serving the needy. Comments (16) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Jim Cutshall says: The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Martinsville, VA September 25, 2017 at 5:03 pm Lobsters are delicious and meant to be consumed by us. The fact that we are having this discussion borders on the pathetic. Enough of this madness. Elizabeth Searle says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET October 3, 2017 at 7:31 am A simple and compassionate technique involves dropping live lobsters into a pool of fresh water. They slowly die in a few minutes and then can be boiled. I am a Mainer and we eat plenty of lobsters. An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ The Rev. Bret B. Hays says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Reverend Adrian A. Amaya says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Press Release Service Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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Episcopales ayudan a incrementar el número de inscritos en el…

first_img Press Release Service Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Faith & Politics, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Bath, NC Donald Trump, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopales ayudan a incrementar el número de inscritos en el Obamacare pese a las dificultades orquestadas por Trump Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Por David PaulsenPosted Nov 28, 2017 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Episcopal News Service] Los anuncios de la muerte del Obamacare pueden haber sido una exageración.Millones de estadounidenses se han inscrito este mes en el seguro de salud en HealthCare.Gov, el sitio web establecido por la Ley de Atención Médica Asequible, pese a que el gobierno de Trump redujo los costos de publicidad y ayuda y declaró la ley emblemática del presidente Obama “muerta” y “desaparecida”.  La Administración también redujo el tiempo de inscripción a la mitad, de manera que en un período de sólo 45 días los episcopales se han unido con activistas y organizaciones de todo el país para correr la voz. Hasta ahora, esos empeños parecen haber tenido inmenso éxito en tanto se acerca la fecha límite del 15 de diciembre.“Esto ha sido divertido. Ha sido la historia del subestimado”, le dijo Ariel Miller, episcopal de Cincinnati, Ohio, a Episcopal News Service. Ella ha trabajado a nivel de base para propagar la noticia en las redes sociales e invitar a los medios de prensa a que cubran el período de inscripción. “Estamos tratando de que la gente cobre conciencia de que todos los recursos siguen estando allí”.La Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales de la Iglesia Episcopal ha alentado a diócesis y congregaciones a ayudar a promover el período de inscripción siempre que puedan. Con frecuencia esa promoción ha significado simplemente la distribución de información clave acerca del proceso. La Diócesis de Ohio Sur invitó a Miller, ex directora ejecutiva de Servicios Episcopales Comunitarios, a escribir un artículo para el boletín digital diocesano.El 2 de diciembre, de 8 A.M. a 4 P.M., la iglesia episcopal de San Juan [St. John’s Episcopal Church] en Sylva, Carolina del Norte, servirá de anfitrión a Ayuda Legal de Carolina del Norte [Legal Aid of North Carolina], una agrupación que ofrece orientación a los residentes del estado que andan buscando adquirir un seguro de salud en el mercado federal.“Estaba contenta de abrir la iglesia para algo como esto”, dijo la Rda. Pattie Curtis, rectora de San Juan. “Creo que las personas deben tener acceso a una atención médica asequible”.La Oficina de Relaciones Gubernamentales, aunque no participa en el proceso de inscripción, tiene enlaces en su cibersitio con recursos que pueden ayudar a las personas que buscan inscribirse en un seguro de salud o los que quieren ayudar a correr la voz.La oficina también ha abogado en Washington, D.C., a favor de políticas que cumplirían múltiples resoluciones de la Convención General que reclaman atención sanitaria universal o pasos en esa dirección, de manera más notable en una serie de resoluciones aprobadas en 2009. Una de las resoluciones citaba “el mensaje del Evangelio de preocupación por los demás que se extiende a interés por su salud física así como por su bienestar espiritual”.Ese mensaje ha inspirado la obra de Miller en Ohio.“Creo que Jesús dedicó una enorme cantidad de tiempo a escuchar y a responder a personas que estaban enfermas y a ayudarles a vencer su enfermedad”, dijo ella.Sara Lilja, directora del Ministerio de Defensa Social Luterano Episcopal de New Jersey, ve semejante inspiración para su labor de la agencia en ayudar a las personas a tomar un seguro de salud conforme a la Ley de Atención Médica Asequible.“Jesús una y otra vez en el texto [sagrado] promueve la salud y busca que todos los hijos de Dios estén bien tanto física como espiritualmente”, dijo Lilja.Su agencia, una asociación de la dos diócesis episcopales del estado y del sínodo de Nueva Jersey de la Iglesia Evangélica Luterana en América, ha buscado  conectar a más personas con la cobertura del seguro durante el período federal de inscripción proporcionando información directamente a clérigos que atienden a grupos más propensos a tener dificultades en obtener cobertura o llevar a cabo el proceso por vía electrónica, tales como ancianos, pobres e inmigrantes.La agencia también envía semanalmente un boletín digital a sus suscriptores que asocia las lecturas litúrgicas de cada domingo a los acontecimientos actuales y cuestiones de política. La atención sanitaria ha sido un tema importante desde que comenzó la inscripción federal el 1 de noviembre, especialmente teniendo en cuenta las reducciones federales y estatales a la promoción y la ayuda a la inscripción.“Estamos intentando llenar los agujeros con nuestros asociados de la comunidad y organizaciones fiables en el estado”, dijo Lilja. “Es un asunto absolutamente espiritual, es un problema de fe y es también un problema de política pública. Y en definitiva, es un problema económico”.La fecha límite de inscripción en HealthCare.Gov es el 15 de diciembre. Foto ilustración de ENS.Cerca de 800.000 personas se inscribieron para obtener seguro de salud en HealthCare.gov en la semana que terminó el 18 de noviembre, aumentando el total acumulativo a casi 2,3 millones, según la actualización semanal más reciente de los Centros[federales] para los Servicios de Medicare y Medicaid.Las inscripciones en estas primeras semanas han sobrepasado los resultados vistos en los últimos años hasta este punto. Queda por ver si el período de inscripción más corto tendrá un efecto negativo en el último total, y hay otras amenazas a la sostenibilidad del mercado federal, tal como la pérdida de algunos proveedores de salud. Pero los partidarios de la Ley de Atención Médica Asequible dicen que la masiva respuesta a la inscripción dista de los terribles pronósticos del presidente Donald Trump y de los republicanos en el Congreso.“Es el mayor comienzo que jamás haya habido a una inscripción abierta”, dijo Lori Lodes, ex funcionaria del gobierno de Obama,  al New York Times luego de que se dieran a conocer los totales de la primera semana. Lodes es fundadora de Get America Covered, una institución sin fines de lucro que ayuda a propagar información sobre opciones de seguros de salud.“Muestra que la gente quiere obtener un seguro de salud y que lo valora”.HealthCare.gov es el sitio para inscribirse en los 39 estados que optaron por establecer su propio mercado de seguros. El año pasado, 9,2 millones se inscribieron a través del mercado federal durante un período de inscripción que duró hasta fines de enero.Este año, Florida tenía el mayor número de inscripciones hasta el 18 de noviembre, con casi 500.000, seguido por Texas con 272.000.Texas está clasificado como el último [estado] del país en el acceso a la atención sanitaria, dijo Brian Sasser de la Fundación Episcopal de la Salud, de manera que el número de los inscritos allí son motivo de esperanza.“Esa es la manera más fácil que la gente tiene ahora de conseguir un seguro de salud, y creemos que el acceso a la atención médica es una razón fundamental por la que muchas personas no tienen atención médica preventiva ni el cuidado que necesitan”, dijo Sasser, director de comunicaciones de la fundación con sede en Houston, la cual sirve a la Diócesis de Texas. “Si das acceso a la atención sanitaria, eso hace a una comunidad más sana en general”.Este año, la fundación otorgó $92.000 a un grupo llamado Jóvenes Invencibles para ayudar a promover el período de inscripción para jóvenes adultos en Texas.La fundación también realiza investigaciones sobre el problema de las personas sin seguro [de salud] en Texas y del impacto que ha tenido la Ley de Atención Médica Asequible en el aumento de la tasa de cobertura. Sasser dijo que el objetivo de la investigación es ayudar a mejorar el acceso al cuidado de la salud para todos los texanos: “¿Qué se logra con evitar que las personas tengan acceso a la atención sanitaria y qué podemos aprender de lo que sale bien y de lo que sale mal al aumentarlo?”– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él a [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Health & Healthcare Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

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La Convención General adopta un Nuevo enfoque sobre los temas…

first_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 General Convention, General Convention 2018, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Una mujer palestina pasa el 1 de junio por el punto de control israelí en Belén, en la Cisjordania ocupada, para asistir a la oración del viernes en la mezquita de Al-Aqsa de Jerusalén, durante el mes de ayuno ritual de Ramadán.[Episcopal News Service] Un grupo de obispos y diputados a los que les pidieron que encontraran un modo de abordar las discusiones con frecuencia espinosas de la política de la Iglesia Episcopal hacia el conflicto israelí-palestino ha dado a conocer sus recomendaciones auspiciando un debate abierto y productivo sobre el tema en la Convención General en el próximo mes de julio.Cinco obispos y cinco miembros de la Cámara de Diputados participaron en el Equipo de Trabajo sobre Israel y Palestina, creado el año pasado por el obispo primado Michael Curry y la Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados. Curry y Jennings han aceptado las tres recomendaciones fundamentales del equipo de trabajo, según un correo electrónico enviado el 31 de mayo a los miembros de ambas cámaras por el Rdo. Michael Barlowe, director ejecutivo de la Convención General.“A los miembros del equipo de trabajo no se les pidió que orientaran a la Convención General de ningún modo particular sobre los asuntos esenciales, acerca de los cuales los miembros tienen varios puntos de vista”, dijo Barlowe. En lugar de eso, los 10 miembros dieron a conocer las recomendaciones siguientes para facilitar “una participación devota, ponderada y respetuosa que facilite un genuino discernimiento”.Se insta a todos los miembros de la Cámara de Obispos y de la Cámara de Diputados a revisar la lista de materialesacopiados por el equipo de trabajo. La lista incluye lecturas que se sugieren sobre problemas relacionados con las relaciones israelí-palestinas y antecedentes respecto al papel de la Iglesia Episcopal en el pasado sobre esos asuntos.Cada cámara conviene en reanudar estos temas a través de un “orden del día especial” que permitirá que audiencias y discusiones tengan lugar a principios de la Convención y garantice que el debate no se vea marginado por barreras de procedimiento (Véase aquí la página 204para más información sobre el orden del día especial).La Cámara de Diputados será la cámara donde se inicie cada resolución relacionada con Israel y Palestina.“Estoy muy agradecido al equipo de trabajo por su labor”, dijo Curry en un comunicado por email. “Su tarea hará posible que la Convención tenga un discusión profunda y piadosa que tome en consideración los aspectos humanitarios en Israel y Palestina. Haciendo así podemos orar y laborar por la paz de Jerusalén”.Jennings aludió en una declaración por escrito a los retos [que el tema] ha de enfrentar.“Se nos avecinan algunas conversaciones difíciles sobre Tierra Santa en la Convención General” afirmó. “Le estoy agradecida a los diputados y obispos del Equipo de Trabajo sobre Israel y Palestina por recomendar una estructura que nos ayudará a sostener esas conversaciones de manera que sean respetuosas, sustantivas y representativas de la amplia gama de experiencias y opiniones de los episcopales”.Iniciar el debate en la Cámara de Diputados, que es un organismo más grande y más diverso, ayudará a garantizar un debate más amplio, dijo el Rdo. Brian Grieves, miembro de la Cámara de Diputados que formó parte del Equipo de Trabajo sobre Israel y Palestina. Ambas cámaras tienen interés en llevar adelante este debate.Subyacente en las deliberaciones del equipo de trabajo estaba el imperativo: “¿cómo podríamos tener un debate que sea abierto y respetuoso y transparente en el proceso?”, dijo Grieves a Episcopal News Service. “Porque en el pasado ha habido preocupaciones de que no ha sido así. Las cosas se han embotellado en los comités”.La Convención General ha votado durante décadas en apoyo de la paz para el Oriente Medio; sin embargo, la cuestión de si aplicar mayor presión económica a Israel por su ocupación de los Territorios Palestinos ha sido un punto candente en los últimos años. En 2012, los obispos se unieron a los diputados en aprobar una resolución a favor de una “inversión positiva” en la región como parte de una muestra de apoyo a la paz entre judíos, musulmanes y cristianos en Tierra Santa, pero las dos cámara fueron incapaces de ponerse de acuerdo en una segunda resolución que pedía una mayor participación en la responsabilidad social empresarial a través de la cartera de inversiones de la Iglesia.En la Convención General de 2015, una resolución que llamaba a la Iglesia a desinvertir en compañías que sostuvieran ciertos negocios con Israel fue rechazada en una votación en la Cámara de Obispos, lo cual significó que nunca se llegó a someter a la consideración de la Cámara de Diputados.Grieves, que es miembro del Comité Legislativo de Mayordomía e Inversión Socialmente Responsable de la Cámara de Diputados, dijo que la Iglesia ya participa en compromisos empresariales relacionados con Israel y Palestina basados en un informe de 2005 de lo que entonces se llamaba el Comité de Responsabilidad Social en Inversiones del Consejo Ejecutivo. Ese informe tuvo el apoyo del Consejo Ejecutivo, y los resultados pueden verse este año en resoluciones de accionistas respaldadas por la Iglesia que busca influir en Motorola y Caterpillar, dos compañías que tienen contratos con el gobierno israelí.“Creo que el compromiso empresarial ha sido muy bueno, pero creo que aquí puede que estemos en un punto donde nosotros, como Iglesia, [tendríamos] que ponerle fin a nuestra complicidad en seguir trabajando con estas compañías”, dijo Grieves. “No sé cuándo debe llegarse a ese punto. Creo que debemos pensar con cuidado al respecto, y eso es parte de la discusión que va a tener lugar en la Convención”.Se esperan numerosas resoluciones de la Convención General sobre temas relacionados con Israel y Palestina para el tiempo en que se inicie la reunión el 5 de julio en Austin, Texas. Hasta ahora se han presentado por lo menos tres, entre ellas una propuesta por la Diócesis de California que reintroduce una presión en pro de la desinversión de “esas compañías que lucran de la ocupación de Israel de tierras palestinas o cuyos productos o acciones apoyan la infraestructura de la ocupación”.El compromiso empresarial no será el único tema relacionado con Tierra Santa. Dos resoluciones adicionales piden mayor atención al sufrimiento de los niños palestinos, incluidos los que son juzgados en tribunales militares israelíes.El conflicto israelí-palestino debe finalmente generar una mayor diversidad de resoluciones en esta Convención General, dijo Sarah Lawton, que preside el comité de Justicia Social y Política Internacional de la Cámara de Diputados. Esa variedad está relacionada con el número de importantes sucesos en la región en los últimos años, desde la ruptura del proceso de paz a la indignación mundial por la decisión del gobierno de Trump de mudar la embajada de EE.UU. de Tel Aviv a Jerusalén.En el pasado, la Convención General ha debatido en ocasiones una sola resolución más amplia que aborda en su conjunto múltiples aspectos del conflicto, lo cual dificulta el avance de medidas individuales, pero Lawton dijo que esta vez debe ser diferente. “No se trata de llevar adelante una sola resolución grande, sino de varias de ellas”, explicó Lawton, que también fue miembro del Equipo de Trabajo sobre Israel y Palestina.El obispo Barry Beisner, otro miembro del equipo de trabajo, ha presentado una resolución en la que busca reafirmar la posición de la Iglesia en apoyo de Jerusalén como una ciudad abierta, donde cristianos, musulmanes y judíos tengan libre acceso a los lugares sagrados. Él no espera que esa resolución genere mucha controversia, pero “hay un amplio espectro de opinión sobre cualquier número de temas relacionados”.Beisner enfatizó el valor de la lista de materiales reunidos por el equipo de trabajo, para ayudar a la Convención General a prepararse para esas discusiones. Y los obispos no están renunciando a su voz al convenir en que las deliberaciones comiencen en la Cámara de Diputados, expresó él.“Ayudará a acelerar la consideración de estas resoluciones el tenerlas inicialmente bajo esa única tienda”, dijo Beisner, que es miembro del Comité de Justicia Social y Política Internacional.Con tantos asuntos en juego, Lawton cree que las personas de todos los bandos en este debate tienen interés en evitar los errores de procedimiento que puedan conducir a la inacción.“Hemos tenido un momento difícil con esta conversación [acerca de Israel y Palestina]. Una de las maneras en que resultó difícil se materializó en el proceso”, dijo ella. “Estos son asuntos importantes, y debemos ser capaces de hablar de ellos y no sentir temor de decir algo”.– David Paulsen es redactor y reportero de Episcopal News Service. Pueden dirigirse a él en [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Youth Minister Lorton, VA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY La Convención General adopta un Nuevo enfoque sobre los temas de Israel y Palestina que provocan un amplio debate Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Por David PaulsenPosted Jun 8, 2018 Rector Albany, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Advocacy Peace & Justice, Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Israel-Palestine, Middle East last_img read more

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Anglican Communion prepares to welcome Chile as 40th province

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Posted Nov 1, 2018 Featured Jobs & Calls Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Anglican Communion prepares to welcome Chile as 40th province Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, IL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Anglican Communion, Rector Knoxville, TN This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI center_img [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby is traveling to Santiago to officially inaugurate the newest province of the Anglican Communion. The Iglesia Anglicana de Chile – the Anglican Church of Chile – will become the 40th Anglican Communion province when it is inaugurated on Nov. 4. Welby will preside over the ceremony, which will be held at the Grange School in the city of Santiago. Usual Sunday services in local churches have been suspended to enable people to take part.Read the full article here. Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Events Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Shreveport, LA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Washington, DC Latin America Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

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