E-learning training pilot for RAF

first_img Previous Article Next Article E-learning training pilot for RAFOn 1 Nov 2003 in Personnel Today The RAF is commissioning training consultancy LINE Communications to convertone of its mandatory training courses for Tornado aircraft managers toe-learning as part of a bigger plan to implement online learning across theMinistry of Defence (MoD). The course is aimed at officers and seniornon-commissioned officers assuming management positions within Tornadosquadrons. “This is one of a number of pilot projects aimed at increasing our experienceof e-learning prior to the anticipated launch of the MoD-wide e-learning systemknown as DELDMC,” said squadron leader Keith Watt. “We are looking tosee both where and how e-learning works for the student, the trainer and theoperating unit in the RAF”. LINE is working closely with the RAF on the content, much of which is beingre-used and re-purposed from existing material. The four-hour programmecomprises a blend of text, graphics and photography, along with animations offly-throughs to give context to complex technical elements. LINE also collaborated with the RAF to utilise existing lesson plans. Amajor consideration was to ensure the content is future-proof because it willbe posted on the DELDMC, which is yet to be implemented. “In terms of content, the challenge was to create learning materialthat is as good as or better than a classroom experience, and to positione-learning in a blended way as this content forms part of a week-longcourse,” explained LINE’s chief executive Piers Lea, who added that it wasalso crucial to build a relationship of trust and confidence with RAF trainingstaff, as for many, this was their first taste of e-learning. “It was important to be seen as credible, and to add value in front ofsubject matter experts and experienced classroom trainers,” he says. Andy Key, a director at LINE who is closely involved with the project,believes the RAF commission represents the next wave of e-learningimplementations. “The focus has shifted away from the LMS to the user and trainerexperience,” he said. “Content leads this debate. The approach theRAF is taking indicates a very strategic and holistic approach.” www.line.co.uk Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Utah State Football’s Matt Wells, Utah’s Kyle Whittingham, Named As Semifinalists For Munger Coach of the Year Award

first_img Brad James Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLOGAN, Utah-Wednesday, Utah State football head coach Matt Wells and Utah head coach Kyle Whittingham were named as a semifinalists for the 2018 George Munger College Coach of the Year Award as announced by Maxwell Football Club President Mark Dianno.Wells and Whittingham are among 18 coaches nationwide to be nominated for this award.Under Whittingham, the Utes are 8-3 headed into the regular season finale against BYU Saturday and the Pac-12 championship game November 30. This is the first time in school history that Utah has played for a Pac-12 championship.With Wells at the helm, Utah State is 10-1 for the first time in school history and will be playing for the Mountain West Conference’s Mountain Division title Saturday at Boise State.Semifinalist voting for this award will begin November 26 and close December 10.Finalist voting opens December 11 and will run through December 27 with the winner to be announced the following day.The award will be presented at the Maxwell Football Club’s National Awards Gala March 8, 2019 at the Tropicana Resort of Atlantic City, N.J. Tags: Boise State/BYU/Kyle Whittingham/Mark Dianno/Matt Wells/Maxwell Football Club/Mountain Division/Mountain West Conference/Utah Football/Utah State Football November 21, 2018 /Sports News – Local Utah State Football’s Matt Wells, Utah’s Kyle Whittingham, Named As Semifinalists For Munger Coach of the Year Awardlast_img read more

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Indonesian KCR-60 fast-attack craft getting BAE’s 57mm guns

first_img View post tag: KCR-60 A total of four locally-built Indonesian Navy KCR-60 fast-attack craft will be receiving BAE Systems’ Bofors 57 Mk3 naval guns under an initial four-unit contract signed between the UK-based defense contractor and government-owned shipbuilder PT PAL Indonesia.Two of the new 57 Mk3 systems will be for two KCR-60 vessels currently under construction, while the remaining two guns will be integrated onto two existing KCR-60 ships.The gun systems will be produced at BAE Systems facilities in Karlskoga, Sweden. The first unit is scheduled for delivery in 2020 and the final unit in 2021.With a length of 60 meters, the KCR-60 was designed to quickly deploy guided anti-ship missiles against surface combatants and then rapidly and safely withdraw into the region’s archipelagos. Three KCR-60 vessels are currently in service with the Indonesian Navy, Tentara Nasional Indonesia-Angkatan Laut, or TNI-AL, with a fourth ship scheduled to be operational in 2021.In January this year, the Indonesian defense ministry ordered an additional four KCR-60M-class vessels with PT PAL.“This most recent contract with PT PAL Indonesia signifies the nation’s continued trust that BAE Systems naval guns consistently meet quality requirements and capability needs,” said Ulf Einefors, director of Weapon Systems Sweden at BAE Systems.The Bofors 57mm naval gun is designed to address surface, air, and land threats in the littoral environment, and is already in service with a wide range of navies and coast guards, including those of the United States, Canada, Sweden, Finland and Mexico. View post tag: Indonesian Navy View post tag: BAe Systems navaltoday Authoritiescenter_img Indonesian KCR-60 fast-attack craft getting BAE’s 57mm guns Back to overview,Home naval-today Indonesian KCR-60 fast-attack craft getting BAE’s 57mm guns August 21, 2019, by Share this articlelast_img read more

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Smitty’s Loyal Customers Celebrate Last Weekend of the Season

first_imgBy Tim KellyThere’s always a bit of melancholy in the air around the Clam Bar, AKA Smitty’s, on closing weekend. However on Friday, most in attendance at the Somers Point seafood lovers’ institution were laughing and smiling.And why shouldn’t they be happy? The weather was perfect, the atmosphere jovial, and the food as always was beyond tasty and reasonably priced. Besides, one fan remarked, “there are still two more nights left after this one.”Customers jammed the parking areas and side streets and crowded the outdoor clam bar. They lined up to have their names placed on the waiting list (“only 45 minutes? That’s nothing!” one exclaimed) and cracked open bottles of beer and wine. The eclectic mix of locals and visitors, blue collar and white,mingled easily. Singles, couples and families of all shapes and sizes were represented.Patrice Popovic, who owns the bustling landmark with husband Pete, faced the onslaught with stoicism and a smile.Erin Long with kids (clockwise from right) Lili, Philip, Elena, and Lydia were on hand to grab take-out dinners Friday“It’s always a little bittersweet to say goodbye to the people you see almost every day, and the many friends old and new.” However, Popovic’s smile said volumes as she greeted a customer with a hug.She had extra reason to be happy this year, she said, because her winter home in Key West, Florida, had been spared significant hurricane damage in the wake of Hurricane Irma.“I wouldn’t be here (in New Jersey) if there had been damage,” she said. “Thankfully that was not the case.”Nearby, local resident Erin Long of Egg Harbor Township was at the front of a short line for her take-out order to be filled. Her four young children, waiting quietly and patiently, were in tow.“We’ve been coming here for a long time,” Long said. “My husband, who is from Ventnor, introduced me and it has become a family tradition.”Noah Dix, a 15-year-old sophomore at Mainland Regional High School from Linwood, had just finished his meal at the outdoor clam bar and quality time with his father, Michael.The fresh menu items share billing with “last night” announcement at the Clam Bar.“I wish they would stay open a little longer, but I understand they have to close as most of the tourists have left,” he said. That takes nothing away from the summer fun he enjoyed, Noah said, and a big part of that included meals at Smitty’s.“Sometimes I take my boat over here from the Seaview Docks in Linwood,” he said. Smitty’s property includes a few boat slips for those who eschew the roads and arrive via the bay.1For the Wert family of Doylestown, PA, it was a car arrival, but with a purpose. “We planned our whole weekend around coming here,” Bill Wert said. He was with wife Sandy, daughter Laurel and son J.D.“We weren’t able to be here for the opening weekend,” Sandy said, “so we made darn sure we were going to be here for the closing weekend.”The last few days of the season are some of the hardest for the staff, Popovic said. Many of the servers are fulltime teachers and now that school is open “(the teachers) really have to scramble to get over here as quickly as they can, but somehow it always seems to come together.”Stan and Reeda Bockman, of Pitman, said they have been coming to Smittys for 30 years, and every time they come it is a new and special experience. “I was here recently and bumped into my opthamologist from home. You never know who you’ll see here.”Popovich said the restaurant was wrapping up its 44th season and she was working on some special surprises to celebrate next year’s landmark 45th anniversary.Noah Dix (left) and dad Michael Dix of Linwood.With all that said, though, the Smitty’s experience really comes back to the eatery’s stock in trade: freshly caught and expertly prepared fish, scallops, steamed clams, fried seafood and signature baked seafood casseroles, just to name a few popular choices. It’s all about the food.Jim Cramer of Egg Harbor Township summed up Friday’s mood as he waited for a table with wife Donna and friends Rob Barrett and Madonna Sill: “Sure it’s a little bit sad they are closing,” he said, “but now we really have something to look forward to in the spring.”last_img read more

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Faith not in God, but in humanity

first_imgMoments after receiving the sixth annual Outstanding Lifetime Achievement Award in Cultural Humanism at Harvard’s historic Memorial Church, Emmy-award winning comedian, actor, and aspiring politician Eddie Izzard delighted in sharing a typo on his award with the audience.“There’s an E missing!” he said, grinning wolfishly, of the award presented by the Humanist Community at Harvard, the American Humanist Association,  and the Harvard Community of Humanists, Atheists, and Agnostics as part of Atheist Coming Out Week. “That’s all right, though — if we were religious, everything would have to be perfect, but we’re real people. So I actually prefer this. It’s like a first edition: When it’s got a mistake in it, it’s more impressive.”Famous for his transvestism – “I’m 100 percent boy, plus extra girl” — Izzard delivered his acceptance speech sporting black heels, eyeliner, and colorful nail polish you could see from the balcony. Izzard’s speech mirrored his surreal and whimsical comedy routines, with commentary ranging from the serious — he declared his interest in running for mayor of London in 2020, which prompted the loudest applause of the night — to the irreverent, such as the “messiness” of human sacrifice.Izzard said his atheism stems, in part, from the fact that God never “turns up.” He seamlessly morphed into a reporter covering a natural disaster: No deity in sight.In contrast, Doctors Without Borders, he pointed out later, will get just about anywhere to lend a hand.“No God has ever, ever turned up,” Izzard said. “It’s just us; it’s always been us. If a God does turn up, I’ll eat my words, but until then! … But when there is a disaster, we turn up. We do. We rely on each other.“And think about it — should we be following anything that needs this much praise?” he added. “You never vote for anyone who says, ‘Vote for me and I will lead you! But before I lead you, I will need more praise! Start now, and then I’ll kick into gear, then I’ll lead you.’ No! You want a leader that says, ‘You know me, I know you, one for all, all for one, let’s go for it.’ That’s what we want, isn’t it?”Drawing from current events and history, Izzard ruminated on Pope Benedict XVI’s recent resignation and marveled at Pope Pius IX’s defining infallibility as dogma in the 19thcentury — “which is amazing!” Izzard said in a high-pitched stage whisper, eliciting cheers from the crowd. He noted that after declaring himself infallible, Pius didn’t follow up with concrete action like editing the Bible “to get rid of all this slavery stuff. Interesting, that.”Izzard declared a deep reverence for Monty Python, the British surreal comedy group, and belief in one other thing: the Golden Rule. “Do unto others as you would have others do unto you,” he said. “It’s in every single religion. That’s the only thing you need. You don’t need to do anything else.”Izzard also encouraged the crowd to use scientific advances, such as mapping the human genome, to confront prejudice. His most recent project, a BBC series titled “Meet the Izzards,” used Izzard’s own DNA to trace his ancestry back 200,000 years.“The cost for running your genome is coming down, so I encourage you to get it done, because it kills racism,” Izzard said. “We’re related, we’re all the same family, from just 10,000 years back. Plus, as soon as space aliens invade, then suddenly all of us will be getting along.”Izzard thanked the humanist community for the award – “especially the misspellings, they’re fun” — and received a two-minute standing ovation from the audience. In closing, he urged his listeners to believe in humanity, and help out.“There are seven billion of us, and most of us are trying to do good things,” he said. “One person can do a lot of damage and can cause a lot of death, as we unfortunately often see here in America, but it’s all the others that I’m talking about. There’s something about that melting pot that encourages us to live and let live. There’s an empathy gene, and most of us have it, and I want to encourage that.”last_img read more

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School of Architecture briefs students on new home for the program

first_imgBond Hall, constructed in 1917 on the coast of Saint Mary’s Lake, has long served as the home for the School of Architecture. But in the fall of 2018, the School will uproot itself from its longtime home and move to a new location. Walsh Family Hall of Architecture, as the new building will be called, will be located on Eddy Street, just south of Legends of Notre Dame and east of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.In Bond Hall on Wednesday night, architecture students were briefed on their new home. Michael Lykoudis, dean of the School of Architecture, began with a discussion of the necessity for a new building.“We were rapidly outsizing [Bond Hall]; we don’t have that much space in the studios,” he said. “We need a different kind of space. Bond Hall is an amazing building, a beautiful building, well-built. The studio layout doesn’t work as studios should. One of the most common complaints I hear is that graduates and undergraduates don’t speak to each other.”The construction process of the new building began three years ago with a donation of $27 million from advisory council members, Matthew and Joyce Walsh.Notre Dame and the School of Architecture chose John Simpson Architects to design Walsh Family Hall. “One of the reasons we selected this firm was not only for the quality of the design but that they actually sold a business model on top of the design,” Lykoudis said. “We have a design of a building that has actually gotten better because of the budget, and the creativity of the architect has actually come through in the challenges.”Simpson then spoke on the overall design of the building, which is heavily rooted in classicism and Greek style. Simpson noted the Temple of Apollo at Didyma as a chief source of inspiration.The central element of the new building will be a stoa, a central portico which will be used as a meeting area.“It is a double-height space; it is designed so it really stands out and gives you a sense of scale as you look out upon it, one whole side is looking out on the green court,” Simpson said.The classrooms are heavily integrated with the stoa, Simpson said.“The way the classrooms are organized is almost like a series of shops that come off from the stoa,” he said. “Some of the activities going on in there relate to what’s going on in the stoa.”A tower at the center of the courtyard is another prominent element of the new building. Simpson said this tower would be “a beacon which was really highlighting this whole part of campus as the arts district.”The announcement and unveiling of this new home for the School of Architecture have created excitement amongst its students.Stephanie Kubus, a sophomore architecture student, said that the instructional spaces will be much improved over those in Bond Hall. “The fact that there’s more space and more classrooms is exciting,” Kubus said. “The studio arrangements will allow for more interaction between years.”Kubus also noted her excitement about certain new design element of the building.“I’m most excited to experience the hall of casts, stoa and terrace,” Kubus said. “Plus there’s lots of natural lighting, which will be beautiful.”Tags: Michael Lykoudis, School of Architecture, Walsh Family Halllast_img read more

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Weekend Picks: Rock and Rave

first_imgRock and Rave – Atlanta, GeorgiaRock & Rave is back for its second year and promises to be even better and more fun than last year. The event takes place at Stone Summit Climbing in Atlanta, Georgia. All proceeds benefit The Southeastern Climbers Coalition, The Access Fund, The Carolina Climbers Coalition and Paradox Sports.Outdoor personality and Patagonia ambassador Timmy O’Neill will host with Tommy Caldwell, Kai Lightner, and Lisa Rands headlining. The presenting sponsor is Outdoor Research.Tickets are $25 in advance, $35 at the door. Advance tickets will be available for pickup or purchase at Stone Summit. Organizers strongly encourage picking up tickets before the event.Stone Summit has agreed to allow car camping in the back parking lot. Porta-Jons and a dumpster will be provided.Doors open for pre-registered patrons who have picked up tickets at stone summit at 6:30pm. Doors open for everyone else at 7 pm.Silent auction runs 7 pm-10 pmTable bouldering with salewa at 7 pmSpeed climbing challenge with cash, swag and prizes at 7 pm.Super-highball bouldering challenge with even more cash and prizes from 8:30 pm -10:30 pm.Timmy O’neill comedy sketch at 10:45 pm.Prana yoga & quiet room all night.Black Diamond stoke raffle drawing with grand prize of $2000 in Black Diamond equipment at 10:30 pm.Then rave on until 2 am.Click here for directions.For more information and to purchase tickets, click here.last_img read more

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Charter change backers are using deception

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion The backers of the proposed/revised/replacement Saratoga Springs city charter are even more confused than I or are playing sleight-of-hand complete with smoke and mirrors.The committee and supporters are claiming to promote professional city management. Yet they mostly support the election of candidates with the lesser experience in the desired field. Are they looking for the best person for the office or trying to run a popularity contest? Some of the loudest critics are individuals who appear to have “sour grapes” because they couldn’t get elected to or hold an elected office in the recent past.I have thoroughly read the published charter revision mailed to my home three times and it’s full of bait-and-switch like a cheap used car contract. They claim to save the taxpayers $568,000 by eliminating five deputy commissioners, then say that they may be retained as departmental directors in a later paragraph.A knowledgeable city manager candidate would examine the city economy and cost of living and would expect a compensation package of over $200,000. The charter proposal states that Watertown has nine director-level positions and Batavia has five or six. Then there are the additional costs for a full-time city attorney and adding an outside auditor ($115,000). Where did the $400,000 savings go?Peter HenningsonSaratoga SpringsMore from The Daily Gazette:Schenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homeslast_img read more

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Morocco NGO delivers emergency supplies to single mums in lockdown

first_imgEach year, INSAF helps over 500 young women who have fallen pregnant out of wedlock — viewed as a “sin” by a society marked by religious conservatism.The organization usually supports the mothers with medical and psychological assistance, tries to mediate between them and their families and helps find jobs for the pregnant women.But that all changed when the coronavirus pandemic struck, with the first distress calls arriving some 15 days after the government declared a health emergency around mid-March.”The epidemic touches everyone, but single mothers are the most vulnerable”, INSAF head Meriem Othmani says. A small van zips through the streets of Casablanca to deliver food to single mothers, as economic paralysis caused by the coronavirus crisis puts pressure on Morocco’s poor.”We have to be quick,” says Bouchra, a coordinator from NGO INSAF who is supervising the day’s rounds.The lockdown to curb the spread of the COVID-19 disease, and a lack of work and money, are creating tensions in the working-class neighbourhoods of the country’s economic capital. “Their families reject them and they have to manage alone with their baby, without any support.”The organization phones a few minutes before the van’s arrival to arrange a pick-up point on the street near the women’s homes. It stops quickly, and the supplies are swiftly offloaded.At each stop, passers-by ask if they can receive assistance too.The single mothers try to avoid being noticed, ashamed of their social status and afraid of the envy of others.”Thank you,” murmurs Habiba before disappearing down an alley with two big bags of supplies.”Many get by doing odd jobs in hairdressing, cleaning, or in the textiles industry or hospitality,” INSAF’s Latifa Ouazahrou says of the single mothers who have now found themselves without work or a safety net. More than three million people out of Morocco’s population of 35 million inhabitants are poor, according to official statistics. The monthly minimum wage is around $260 while three-quarters of workers have no social security cover.The World Bank says around 10 million in Morocco could find themselves in difficulty as the pandemic hits and further pressure mounts due to a drought. In a large room normally used as a kitchen, INSAF teams fill bags with couscous semolina, lentils, potatoes, rice, oil, tea, flour, soap and sanitary products.A leaflet detailing virus protection measures is also included.Emergency deliveries also go to families in isolated hamlets in the central Atlas region, where a drought in the agricultural sector is exerting further pressure. State aid of up to 1,200 dirhams (around $120) is being allocated to needy families to weather the crisis, part of an emergency package also funded by corporate and private donations.In recent days, the first beneficiaries were able to withdraw money from ATMs after receiving a text message from the authorities, thanks to a new payment system set up with help from local banks.But helping the poorest is a challenge, and the country lacks a social register to identify the needs of the population.”Some [single mothers] can’t even buy milk for their baby any more,” Ouazahrou says. “It’s very important to bring them basic necessities.”As of Sunday, the coronavirus had claimed 111 lives in the North African country from a declared total of 1,545 cases. Only around 7,000 tests have been conducted.center_img Topics :last_img read more

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WHO to Latam: Don’t lower COVID-19 guard, deaths could quadruple by October

first_imgThe toll from COVID-19 could rise to 438,000 deaths in Latin America by October if prevention measures are not kept up, the World Health Organization’s regional director for the Americas Carissa Etienne warned on Tuesday.Fatalities so far in Latin America have reached 113,844 or almost one fifth of the number of people who have died globally, according to mapping by Reuters.The Americas is the world epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic and the toll for the whole region could almost treble to 637,000 by Oct. 1, the WHO official said, though she cautioned that mathematical model projections should not be taken literally but only as planning guides. Topics : Under current conditions, the pandemic is expected to peak in Chile and Colombia by mid-July, but in Argentina, Brazil, Bolivia and Peru not until August, and Costa Rica will not flatten its curve of infection until October, she said.Countries, states and cities that relax restrictions too soon can be flooded with new COVID-19 cases, Etienne and other directors of the WHO’s regional branch, the Pan American Health Organization said in a virtual briefing from Washington.”Complacency is our enemy in the fight against COVID-19,” she said, adding: “The battle is tough but it’s far from lost.”In the United States, Washington state and New York are seeing very low numbers of new cases and deaths, but 27 other states are reporting exponential growth, Etienne said.center_img Several Caribbean countries and territories were able to curb transmission completely and have reported no new cases for several weeks, but they need to remain vigilant for months to come, Etienne said.This past week Manaus, in Brazil saw its first day without reporting new deaths from COVID-19, after weeks of dealing with high mortality in the largest city in the Amazon.Brazil has the second most fatal and widespread outbreak in the Americas after the United States and WHO directors said they have repeatedly asked the South American country to increase testing and have a consistent message to population.Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro has downplayed the gravity of coronavirus and criticized quarantine and social distancing measures adopted by states and cities, sending a confusing signal to Brazilians, public health experts say.Countries must be prepared to adjust course quickly if the epidemiological situation changes, the WHO director said.Reopening is not merely a question of suspending travel restrictions and stay-at-home orders. It requires ample testing and adequate contact tracing to quickly detect and control new outbreaks, she said.The Americas region as a whole reported 5.1 million cases and more than 247,000 deaths due to COVID-19 as of June 29.last_img read more

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