Holy Land Lenten Pilgrimage canceled

first_imgA popular and distinctive spring break option offered to students last year has been withdrawn due to logistical difficulties. The Theology and Campus Ministry Departments cancelled this semester’s Holy Land Lenten Pilgrimage, which was to have travelled through Jerusalem, Galilee and Bethlehem. Students going on the Theology department and Campus Ministry sponsored trip received an email earlier this week informing them of the trip’s cancellation. The email was signed by Theology department chair J. Matthew Ashley and interim director of Campus Ministry Fr. Joe Carey. According to the email, “insurmountable logistical problems” contributed to the cancellation of the trip. Ashley said living arrangements were a concern with the trip as planned. “First, there were space constraints at Tantur [an ecumenical institute for theological studies based in Jerusalem], but we were able to work around those,” he said. Budget constraints were also an issue, Ashley said. “The second and more serious problem had to do with airfares,” he said. “The prices are extremely volatile, making it impossible to fix a price for the participants and be sure we could stay within our budget.” Along with the price of airfare, Ashley said safety concerns came into question when planning the flight over to Israel. “There was a serious question as to whether we could secure a block of seats for all the participants on the same flight,” he said. “Because of security issues all of the participants have to travel together.” Last March, a group of students, including junior Colin King, was able to travel to the Holy Land. King said the group’s accommodations were unlike anything he has experienced. “We stayed at Tantur, a Notre Dame residence right on the border of Israeli controlled Jerusalem and Palestinian controlled Bethlehem,” he said. “It’s about a five-minute walk from the massive walls surrounding Bethlehem.” During the day, the students on the trip would travel to holy sites and at night they would learn about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Junior Jackie Bacon said this academic aspect was especially interesting. “It was really cool for me as an Arabic major, learning more about the conflict and being in the moment, seeing how the conflict plays out for these people,” she said. “We were learning what is happening in this part of the world and then seeing the conflict happen when we were walking around.” While King also enjoyed the academic side of the trip and the insight into the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, he said the trip truly deepened his faith. “This trip was first and foremost a spiritual experience, we went to these unbelievable holy places,” he said. “This gave me some tangible sights and images to places that I have always heard about. You read the Bible and now you can picture what you read.”last_img read more

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Seniors react to choice of 2012 Commencement speaker

first_imgWhen Notre Dame administrators took more time than usual to announce the 2012 Commencement speaker, senior Jeremy Lamb said he hoped the delay meant his class would be addressed by a prominent orator. “While in my head I sort of knew [the delay] probably meant the University was having some trouble finding someone to agree to fulfill this role, I couldn’t help but hope that maybe, just maybe, the delay was due to the University going after a really ‘big fish,’ so to speak,” Lamb said. But when the University announced 1995 alumna Haley Scott DeMaria would deliver the 2012 Commencement address, Lamb said his initial reaction to the news was “one of confusion.” “When [I] first learned of her selection, I did a quick Google search,” he said. “As petty as this may sound, I was disheartened a bit by the fact that my commencement speaker did not even have a Wikipedia page.” Senior John Heid said DeMaria’s relative obscurity also influenced his initial reaction to the announcement. “When I first heard, I did not even know who it was until I read the little blurb about it on the Notre Dame website,” Heid said. “I was not happy with the choice.” A member of the Irish women’s swimming team, DeMaria suffered a broken back and was paralyzed when her team’s bus slid off the Indiana Toll Road during a snowstorm in 1992. After doctors told her she might not walk again, DeMaria made an astounding recovery, even returning to swim for the Irish the following year. Despite the inspirational power of DeMaria’s story, Lamb said he thinks Notre Dame could have explored other options in filling the role of commencement speaker.  “I fully acknowledge the tremendous strength that she displayed in her emotional and physical recovery from an event worse than most of us can imagine,” he said. “However, I feel that, if it were the University’s desire to select an individual who has overcome unimaginable personal tragedies or obstacles, there were other options.”  As classmates of deceased students Samuel Marx, Declan Sullivan and Xavier Murphy, the graduating seniors have dealt with significant personal losses during its time at Notre Dame. In this respect, Lamb said, DeMaria was an “appropriate” choice to speak at Commencement. “Our class, more than most others, has had a great amount of experience with tragedy and loss,” Lamb said. “However, I think our class has done an outstanding job of dealing with our own losses and growing from them. In other words, I think maybe the primary lesson that Ms. DeMaria has to offer is one which our class has learned on its own.”  Lamb said he thinks the University chose DeMaria as the speaker to reinforce the Notre Dame community overall instead of focusing specifically on the members of the Class of 2012. “I respect the fact that she is an alumna, but is that necessary?” Lamb said. “Is that going to make her any more relatable for us? It just seems as though maybe the University is trying to take a day that should be 100 percent about us as a class and turning it into something that really just points back to the University as a whole.” Both Lamb and Heid said the University’s reputation as a widely renowned institution is not reflected in the selection of DeMaria to join the ranks of recent Notre Dame commencement speakers as President Barack Obama, news anchor Brian Williams and former U.S. Secretary of Defense Robert Gates. “The fact that the 2012 Commencement speaker will probably be the least notable of the last couple decades, in a group consisting of presidents, CEOs, archbishops and national media figures, didn’t really sit well with me,” Lamb said. “Our University should be able to attract some prominent individuals to speak, whether their prominence be due to commercial success, political prowess or simply social fame.” “Certainly, [DeMaria] is characteristic of the Notre Dame spirit,” Heid said. “But at the same time, it is not fair that previous classes have had presidents, cardinals and governors, and we get somebody that nobody has ever heard of … As a prominent university, we deserve prominent speakers.” For senior Nneka Ekechukwu, DeMaria’s lack of widespread recognition will not take away from the significance of her remarks at Commencement. “I’m looking forward to our speaker and the message she has for us,” Ekechukwu said. “While she is obviously not of the same caliber as having the President, for example, she is someone that has experienced a lot and is sure to have a lot of insight and advice for all of us that are soon to be new alumni of this University.” Ekechukwu said the selection of DeMaria challenges the expectation of inviting household names as commencement speakers. “I think her selection as our speaker is showing everyone that there is not one set type of speaker that a university has or should have,” Ekechukwu said.  The primary role of a commencement speaker does not necessarily have to be providing advice to new graduates, Lamb said.  “Many believe that the purpose of a commencement speaker is to offer advice and insight into how the ‘real world’ works,” he said. “However, my personal opinion is that the commencement speaker should serve primarily to please the graduating class, to excite and entertain them. It is in this capacity that I think the University may have been able to find someone better suited.” Despite any disappointment in the selection of a relatively unknown speaker, Lamb said the 2012 Commencement address merits discussion. “I mean absolutely no disrespect to Ms. DeMaria. I think she has had to go through a lot and has emerged as a successful and strong woman,” Lamb said. “I think this year’s choice of commencement speaker is fairly unique, and therefore deserves an equally unique discussion.” Although his original opinion of DeMaria as a commencement speaker has not changed, Heid said the end result matters most in this situation. “If she delivers a good speech, I will be satisfied,” he said. “Whether or not she will is an open question.”last_img read more

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Engineer uses silver in fuel cells

first_imgWhen it comes to the field of chemical engineering, silver may soon be worth more than platinum. Suljo Linic, associate professor of chemical engineering at the University of Michigan, presented two major innovations making extensive use of silver in fuel and solar cell technology in the department of chemical and biomolecular engineering’s annual Thiele Lecture Tuesday.  Linic began by outlining the need to approach problems in the field of chemical engineering by relying on theory and models to guide experimental design, rather than trial-and-error attempts which lead to only incremental improvements.  Linic said throughout his career he has challenged himself to use this method in his work with chemical transformations. “When I joined the University of Michigan, I defined a difficult challenge for myself – and I think that this is a problem for most people who work in this field – which is to try and develop some models of heterogeneous catalysis,” Linic said. “I want to try and use these models to design materials that can perform certain chemical transformations, either with better efficiency than what we have now or some chemical conversion that we couldn’t execute before.” Linic said he has worked to better understand the mechanism of electrochemical oxidation-reduction reactions in order to design improved fuel cells. He said the current state-of-the-art cells each employ pure platinum to produce an equilibrium potential of roughly 1.1 volts, which is not representative of the true effectiveness of the battery. “The problem is that in the state-of-the-art proton exchange membrane fuel cells we use today we have to sacrifice a large amount of this potential in order to start moving current from the cell,” Linic said. “And the main reason you have to sacrifice this potential is that this reaction is very slow at high potential and hence you only start generating current after losing about 30 percent of the equilibrium potential.” Linic said the solution he developed involves using silver, a much less expensive material, as a substitute for pure platinum, and then scaling up to account for the lower efficiency. “We have been looking at a silver-based compound and we have known for a long time that silver can form this type of reaction at about 10 to 15 times lower rates than platinum. But what we like about silver is that it’s very cheap, about 50 times cheaper than platinum, and when forming silver nanoparticles it allows for a high density of active sites in the material.” Linic said up until recently silver would have been useless in the acidic environment of fuel cells, but advances in new membrane technologies in the last decade allow for silver to be used in basic fuel cells without being prohibitively expensive.  After extensive testing of a variety of silver-based candidate compounds, Linic found that a silver-cobalt alloy achieved the desired level of efficiency, he said. His team set a minimum threshold efficiency of 10 percent of pure platinum’s potential for a viable candidate. “The silver-cobalt alloy actually performed significantly better than pure silver metal – it has a five to six time higher rate than pure monometallic silver, and it’s about half the performance of platinum, which is really good,” Linic said. “If you have a really cheap material you can get by on about 10 percent; this is a 50 percent performance, and it is as stable as platinum in phase.” Linic next discussed using plasmonic nanostructures to enhance solar cell efficiency. Essentially, Linic explained, plasmonic nanostructures are nanoparticles of metal which are characterized by very small interaction with resonant photon excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance. “The interesting thing is that the local surface plasmon resonance takes place at UV-Vis near-infrared light, which means it can be used very nicely for solar applications,” Linic said. After noticing the potential for this application, Linic employed his expertise in silver chemistry to create improved solar cells using the metal as a plasmonic nanostructure.  “We demonstrated that by combining silver nanoparticles with semiconductors we can enhance the photo-catalytic activity of the semiconductor,” Linic said. Linic said these discoveries underscore the importance of understanding the theory in order to engineer significant technological advancements.last_img read more

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Badin ‘Conscious Christmas’ supports Hope Initiative

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Ann-Marie Conrado Students browse the assortment of fair trade products available at lasr year’s Conscious Christmas Fair Trade Handicraft Sale.Conrado, who co-founded the Hope Initiative in 2004, said the sale offers a variety of reasonably priced gifts, including scarves, bags, wall hangings and hemp products.“We sell things that are very affordable, up to quite reasonably priced luxury items like pashmina and silk,” she said. “This is a really great way for people to be conscious of the things that they are buying, how they are purchasing them, that they are ethically sourced, that they are making a big impact. If you are splurging on another person or yourself, you can do it in such a way that it helps and has a much greater impact.”Junior Chau-Ly Phan, one of the event’s organizers, said Badin residents have worked to advertise and set up for the sale.“During the actual event, there are Badin girls helping with the sale by working checkout, answering questions, and being personal shoppers and giving gift advice,” she said. “It’s great having so many girls who care helping out from advertising to moving furniture to helping find the perfect present for someone’s loved one.”Conrado said many of the products at the sale are certified fair trade, while others are the results of actual projects the charity has initiated.“In other cases, we buy from cooperatives that are already established, but we know that the money goes directly to the women. We’re not working through a middle man or a factory or anything like that,” she said. “In every case, what’s important to us is when we buy from a cooperative, whether or not it has gone through the really rigorous process of being certified to the international standards of fair trade, we know that we are buying from women who are entrepreneurial, that are really building their communities. We know that these purchases make a huge impact.”Proceeds from the sale support a variety of projects from the Hope Initiative, including scholarships and initiatives for children of illiterate families, Conrado said.“So where there’s no educational background for that child to succeed we offer before- and after-school programs so that [they] can get extra help in school, that they can be exposed to a stronger educational underpinning,” she said. “[Hope Initiative] uses creative thinking to address issues of poverty and educational access. Because I am a professor of design I like to think that we can offer creative ways to address these intractable human issues and problems in developing countries.”Phan said she traveled to Nepal last summer to meet some of the children in the Hope Initiative orphanage.“They were so adorable, but in the pre-teen and teenage age range, so they might object to being called that, and sweet. They’ve been through so much already, yet are so smart and full of life,” she said.While visiting the youth program, Phan said she was able to see the impact of the Hope Initiative’s work.“I never knew how many kids received scholarships or how many people would be so happy just getting a shirt when we did a clothing distribution program,” she said. “While we were able to help them and they were so happy, I also saw so many more ways we could help them. The Hope Initiative also has plans to grow and adapt to the changing needs of the Nepali people, but support is needed to achieve those goals. Badin helps those goals come to fruition through A Conscious Christmas and the Polar Bear Plunge next semester.”Phan said when the sale raises more money, the Hope Initiative is able to disburse more scholarships and host health clinics.“In one sale, we have the opportunity to provide these kids with opportunities and the care they deserve for the entire year, and if enough people purchase goods, we can help so many more people throughout the year.”Tags: Ann-Marie Conrado, badin hall, Conscious Christmas, fair trade, Hope Initiative Badin Hall’s sixth annual Conscious Christmas Fair Trade Handicraft Sale will run Friday from 12 p.m. to 8p.m. in the dorm, and all proceeds from the sale will support the Hope Initiative, industrial design professor Ann-Marie Conrado said.last_img read more

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Debate examines meaning of marriage

first_imgOn Tuesday, the debate “What is Marriage?” examined the definition and meaning of marriage and looked at both sides of the same-sex marriage debate.The Tocqueville Program for Inquiry Into Religion and American Public Life and the Dean’s Fellows of the College of Arts and Letters co-sponsored the event, which featured Dr. John Corvino and Sherif Girgis, two recognized scholars on either side of the debate. Political science professor Patrick Deneen moderated.The event comes on the heels of a recent Supreme Court decision to review a case challenging state bans on same-sex marriage.Deneen introduced Girgis, a current PhD candidate in philosophy at Princeton University and law student at Yale Law School, as “on the side of defense of the more traditional definition of marriage between a man and a woman,” and Corvino, chair of the philosophy department at Wayne State University, as “seeking an argument on the behalf of the expansion of that definition to include same-sex couples.”In his opening statements, Girgis said the audience at Notre Dame was different than many he had faced before, particularly when debating Corvino.“This is also the first time I’m at a place where things might be a little more evenly divided in the audience, if not a little bit slanted towards me, so I’m going to do what many of you might regard as tying both hands behind my back,” Girgis said. “I am not going to argue for morality. I’m not going to argue from tradition — the way that things always have been, and it’s the way they have to be. And I’m not going to argue from religion although I’m a Catholic, and I think that religious arguments are perfectly reasonable.”Girgis said grounds for his argument against the expansion of the definition of marriage may be found in a fundamental flaw within the argument for such an expansion.“I’m going to argue that what I’m going to call the revisionist view of marriage, that marriage should include same-sex relationships, actually has deep contradiction at its core,” Girgis said. “… It actually ultimately undermines the very thing it’s trying to do, which is to describe the principle difference between marriage and other kinds of companionship.”Corvino said marriage as an institution has traditional origins, but it has at times had a more flexible definition and practice. Perceived distinctions between “marriage and other kinds of companionship” are subjective, Corvino said.“Marriage is a social institution recognizing committed adult unions, which are presumptively sexual and exclusive … and which typically involve sharing domestic life, mutual care and concern, and the begetting caring for children,” Corvino said. “I say ‘presumptively’ and ‘typically’ in there because we can look throughout history and find exceptions that we would still recognize as marriage. We may not think they’re ideal, we may not think they make for good marriage policy, but they are still marriage.”Corvino said the expansion of the definition of marriage encourages inclusivity within American society.“Why do people find the idea of same-sex marriage compelling?” Corvino said.  “… I think it boils down to some very simple premises, including the idea that relationships are good for people, that marriage is good for relationships, and that some of our fellow citizens happen to be gay.”Echoing that theme, Corvino said in his closing statements that the benefits of marriage transcend the boundary between homosexuality and heterosexuality.“Relationships are good for people; they help people grow,” Corvino said. “Marriage as a public commitment and as a personal union is good for relationships. And that this is true for those of us who do not, or cannot, engage in the sort of sex that includes coitus.”Girgis and Corvino also appeared on Vantage Point, the College of Arts and Letters NPR radio program on Tuesday night, in a segment entitled “Why Get Married?” with Notre Dame professor of sociology Richard Williams.Tags: gay marriage, Gay Marriage Debate, John Corvino, marriage, Sherif Girgis, What is Marriage?last_img read more

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Notre Dame International adds new summer programs

first_imgMore than 500 students students studied abroad through Notre Dame International (NDI) programs across the world this summer — including seven new locations — according to Rosemary Max, director of international programs at the University.New locations for summer 2016 included Brazil, Berlin, Rome, Japan and Russia.“Some of the new locations are chosen because we … have a faculty member who is very interested in a location and wants to start a program there,” Max said. “Our China Summer Language Program is a perfect example of that. Others are because we see a need that isn’t being filled. For example, we didn’t have a lot of options in Africa, and we believe that South Africa was such a good destination, so we worked with faculty to develop a program there.”Max said new summer programs were added to give Notre Dame students the same opportunities that students at peer institutions were receiving.“Many schools around the US … offer both semester traditional programs for students and offer summer short term programs,” she said.“A few years ago, we realized that our summer offerings were few, so we’ve been expanding those.”In addition to the new programs, Max said NDI continued to run popular programs, such as London and Dublin.“Some longstanding summer programs that we’ve had, like the London Program, are a mainstay for us, and it remains a very popular program for us,” Max said. “This summer we had over 80 students go to London, and so we are going to continue to run the program. We always tweak and update due to student feedback though. We send out surveys and make changes accordingly.”According to Max, the summer programs can last three, five or six weeks.“The feedback that we get from students is that the three-week intensive period is very formative for them,”  she said.“There is a lot that they get out from being together, and being with a faculty member, for a three-week period. The overwhelming positive feedback on that timeframe was a surprise. I do think that having a very close relationship with a faculty member over that time is very positive for students.”Max said she believes the three-week programs, particularly those that run at the end of May into the first week of June are most convenient for students.“It is a great time for students to go abroad … whether they go abroad in addition to a semester abroad or in addition to another summer abroad program,” she said. “That is a really nice time slot before they might begin an internship or begin anything else they are doing for the summer.”In addition to the summer programs that NDI ran for upperclassmen, they also ran programs for incoming first-year students who matriculated to Notre Dame the fall after they completed the program.“They start out with a three-week intensive program before they even get to Notre Dame,” she said. “One model, they do a seminar for the rest of the term here and in another model, the course concludes once they arrive on campus.”Max said overall more students study abroad during the entire academic year than during the summer. However, Notre Dame sent more students overseas during the summer than they did during either the fall or spring semester.“Summer is now the biggest term for us,” she said. “If you count the fall [semester] as one term, the spring [semester] as one term, and the summer [semester] as one term, summer is the biggest term. The next year or two will be a really test for us to see how large our summer programs grow.”Tags: NDI, Notre Dame International, study abroadlast_img read more

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School of Architecture briefs students on new home for the program

first_imgBond Hall, constructed in 1917 on the coast of Saint Mary’s Lake, has long served as the home for the School of Architecture. But in the fall of 2018, the School will uproot itself from its longtime home and move to a new location. Walsh Family Hall of Architecture, as the new building will be called, will be located on Eddy Street, just south of Legends of Notre Dame and east of the DeBartolo Performing Arts Center.In Bond Hall on Wednesday night, architecture students were briefed on their new home. Michael Lykoudis, dean of the School of Architecture, began with a discussion of the necessity for a new building.“We were rapidly outsizing [Bond Hall]; we don’t have that much space in the studios,” he said. “We need a different kind of space. Bond Hall is an amazing building, a beautiful building, well-built. The studio layout doesn’t work as studios should. One of the most common complaints I hear is that graduates and undergraduates don’t speak to each other.”The construction process of the new building began three years ago with a donation of $27 million from advisory council members, Matthew and Joyce Walsh.Notre Dame and the School of Architecture chose John Simpson Architects to design Walsh Family Hall. “One of the reasons we selected this firm was not only for the quality of the design but that they actually sold a business model on top of the design,” Lykoudis said. “We have a design of a building that has actually gotten better because of the budget, and the creativity of the architect has actually come through in the challenges.”Simpson then spoke on the overall design of the building, which is heavily rooted in classicism and Greek style. Simpson noted the Temple of Apollo at Didyma as a chief source of inspiration.The central element of the new building will be a stoa, a central portico which will be used as a meeting area.“It is a double-height space; it is designed so it really stands out and gives you a sense of scale as you look out upon it, one whole side is looking out on the green court,” Simpson said.The classrooms are heavily integrated with the stoa, Simpson said.“The way the classrooms are organized is almost like a series of shops that come off from the stoa,” he said. “Some of the activities going on in there relate to what’s going on in the stoa.”A tower at the center of the courtyard is another prominent element of the new building. Simpson said this tower would be “a beacon which was really highlighting this whole part of campus as the arts district.”The announcement and unveiling of this new home for the School of Architecture have created excitement amongst its students.Stephanie Kubus, a sophomore architecture student, said that the instructional spaces will be much improved over those in Bond Hall. “The fact that there’s more space and more classrooms is exciting,” Kubus said. “The studio arrangements will allow for more interaction between years.”Kubus also noted her excitement about certain new design element of the building.“I’m most excited to experience the hall of casts, stoa and terrace,” Kubus said. “Plus there’s lots of natural lighting, which will be beautiful.”Tags: Michael Lykoudis, School of Architecture, Walsh Family Halllast_img read more

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Panel examines intersection of pro-life, Black Lives Matter movement

first_imgEmma Farnan | The Observer Shawnee Daniels-Sykes, left, Kyle Lantz and Jessica Keating discuss the intersection of the pro-life movement and the Black Lives Movement in a panel Monday. The panel was a part of Stand Against Hate Week and Black Catholic History Month.Discussion began with a brief explanation of both movements. Moderator Kayla August, assistant director of evangelization for Campus Ministry, said the Black Lives Matter movement was not limited to black people, just as the pro-life movement was not limited to only opposing abortion.“The primary mission of Black Lives Matter is to work vigorously for freedom and justice for black people, and by extension, all people, giving the movement a highly intersectional position, extending efforts to all marginalized populations,” she said.The first topic the panel discussed was the Catholic Church’s definition of human dignity.“The concept of human dignity is under attack right now in the United States and in Western Europe as well,” Keating said. “This is a real challenge for us in the Church … to make this argument for human dignity.”She said people were ordered to help one another, citing the history of Christians caring for society’s most vulnerable and unwanted populations, such as children left to die through exposure to the elements.“That was the ancient world’s way of abortion,” she said.Daniels-Sykes connected the concept of human dignity to Black Lives Matter by exploring a parallel between the types of vulnerability represented in each movement.“The Black Lives Matter movement symbolizes a visible vulnerability,” she said. “The pro-life movement symbolizes a non-visible [vulnerability] because the unborn fetus is in the womb.”She attributed the vulnerability of African Americans to implicit bias, citing the deaths of Tamir Rice and John Crawford III, both young African American men who were fatally shot by police officers.“Life has been snuffed out for centuries … this country is based on the [perceived] suspiciousness of people of African descent,” Daniels-Sykes said. “At the heart of [the Black Lives Matter conversation] is a cry that says, ‘I need you to hear that something is wrong. Something is wrong and something needs to be addressed.’”The panelists also spoke about what they felt were common misperceptions of each movement. Speaking from her personal experience as a former pro-choice believer, Keating said the portrayal of pro-life as a homogenous, conservative movement was not accurate. Daniels-Sykes said Black Lives Matter was often portrayed unfairly by the media in a negative and violent light.“Social justice and pro-life are just indivisible in our culture right now,” Keating said. “This idea that life from the womb to the end of life, issues of racism, issues of poverty, these all start to interconnect when you dig into one issue … abortion is related to race, it’s related to domestic violence — it’s a huge predictor.”Lantz said most of these misperceptions depend on the people an individual chooses to be around. He said it was easy to reject an entire movement because of one’s dislike for a single aspect of that movement and that individuals were more likely to dismiss injustice if it didn’t affect them personally.“If my perceptions are based on those I interact with or what I choose to read, I can easily find something to lift up the worst of the other movement and find an example that shows, ‘I don’t care.’” Lantz said.When asked how the two movements fit into the modern pursuit of justice, Keating said a vision of justice begins with remembering and taking ownership of history.“We are a culture that doesn’t remember [our history] anymore,” she said. “Very often, white Americans say, ‘Well I wasn’t a part of racism or slavery,’ distancing ourselves from those effects. But we are Americans, and as Americans, we take on the history of America.”The panelists also agreed the Catholic Church was not perfect in its handling of Black Lives Matter, saying there was room for improvement.“The Church in America is still one of the most segregated places in the country,” Lantz said. Lantz added that church communities tend to address issues most pertinent to themselves and mentioned the difference in interest he witnessed between the attitudes of black churches and white churches when it came to Black Lives Matter.Keating brought up the problem of service learning, saying that while it was good to bring help to communities and movements that needed it, the temporary nature of that type of aid made it problematic.Attendees were invited to text questions for the panel at any time using the number listed on the large screen in Midfield Commons. One student asked about how to build common ground between the two movements, saying they felt both movements were polarized on campus.Keating’s advice was to own both movements by talking about them openly, making the point of both movements being about the preservation of life. Lantz suggested taking an inquisitive approach if speaking out felt too difficult, saying questions were a good starting point for effective conversation.Despite the progress that needs to be made by the Catholic Church in supporting Black Lives Matter, Keating said Catholic teachings were a useful lens to help discern the commonalities between various social justice issues.“Learning the narrative of the scripture, as Christians, is sort of essential,” she said. “It allows you to move with facility between all of these concrete issues which we tend to separate and keep in their own boxes. Knowing the narrative of scripture, we can understand how these all link together when we think about issues of justice.”Tags: Black Catholic History Month, Black lives matter, Pro-life, StaND Against Hate Week As the kick-off event for Black Catholic History month and Notre Dame’s annual Stand Against Hate Week, a public panel reflected on the shared features of two contemporary social justice movements in a panel entitled “Is ‘Black Lives Matter’ a Pro-Life Issue?” The panel was held Monday afternoon in the Duncan Student Center.The panel was comprised of Jessica Keating, director of the Notre Dame Office of Human Dignity and Life Initiatives, Kyle Lantz, director of social concern seminars at the Center for Social Concerns and Shawnee Daniels-Sykes, a Catholic theological ethicist and associate professor of theology at Mount Mary University. The event was organized by Campus Ministry, the Gender Relations Center, Multicultural Student Programs and Services and Notre Dame Right to Life.last_img read more

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Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office Launches New Mobile App

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) Image via apps.apple.com.MAYVILLE – The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office has launched a new mobile app.Sheriff Jim Quattrone says the app is designed to help keep residents and businesses aware of alerts, news and resources.“Information has always been a significant part of the law enforcement profession whether it is being used to solve crime, prevent crime, or for public safety, and that is why we developed this mobile app,” said Sheriff Quattrone.  “I encourage you to download our free app and share it with your family, friends, and neighbors so that they can receive our important news and alerts – especially during this difficult time.”Users are also able to submit a crime tip directly to law enforcement anonymously. The app also features a list of most wanted fugitives and inmates. There is additional a list or map to search for sex offenders across the county.The app can be downloaded on the Apple App Store or Google Play Store.last_img read more

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Person Posing As An Election Official Attempting To Collect Mail-In Ballots

first_imgPixabay Image.WARREN – A person claiming to be a local election official is running a scam asking to collect mail-in ballots in Warren, Pennsylvania. In an alert to residents on Friday Warren County Government officials say they received reports of an individual in the county going door-to-door stating that they are authorized to pick up people’s mail-in ballots.Officials say this is a fraudulent act and for residents to not, under any circumstances, give their ballot to anyone other than an official election worker.If this has happened to you, or you are aware of someone engaging in this activity, officials say to call 911 immediately and report it to the Pennsylvania State Police. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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