A Rock Star and a Seminary: Bono Featured in Fuller’s Film

first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Herbeauty7 Things A Man Will Do Only If He Really Loves YouHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyPretty Or Not: 5 Things You Didn’t Know About BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Instagram Girls Women Obsess OverHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyShort On Time? 10-Minute Workouts Are Just What You NeedHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty6 Fashion Trends You Should Never Try And 6 You’ll LoveHerbeautyHerbeauty 8 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News Subscribe Faith & Religion News A Rock Star and a Seminary: Bono Featured in Fuller’s Film Fuller launches extensive and exclusive online collection about life, faith, God, and spirituality From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, April 26, 2016 | 2:01 pm First Heatwave Expected Next Week Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena More Cool Stuff Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday center_img Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Make a comment Community News Business News Top of the News EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS U2s Sonny Bono and Eugene Peterson. Photo credit: Taylor MartynFuller Theological Seminary, the world’s largest multi-denominational institution for theological graduate education, today announces the launch of Fuller studio an innovative and interactive e-resource sharing exclusive content at no cost for individuals in pursuit of deeply formed spiritual lives.Fuller studio in its debut launch, has been given an extraordinary opportunity to premiere an exclusive 20-minute film, Bono & Eugene Peterson: The Psalms, documenting the unique relationship between this notable activist and lead singer of U2 and cofounder of the ONE Campaign, and the renowned author of the translation of the Bible into contemporary language, The Message. The film revolves around their common interest in the Psalms and is supported on the studio site by a wealth of reflections from Fuller’s world-class faculty—curating forward-thinking theological resources and not delivering flat content from academic classrooms. Bono and Eugene Peterson’s conversation captures the essence of that kind of dialogue on spirituality.In association with Fourth Line Films David Taylor director of Fuller’s Brehm Texas (center for worship, theology, and the arts) and associate professor of theology and culture, delivers a conversation between Peterson and Bono as they reflect on their relationship. Taylor, a friend of Peterson’s, desired to bring Peterson and Bono together to discuss the Psalms, knowing Bono’s inspiration from The Message, and the visit took place at Peterson’s home with Taylor moderating the exchange that unfolded and was captured on film. This added bonus to the public launch of FULLER studio is a perfect demonstration of the content ethos, aesthetic, and categories of Story, Theology, and Voice that the studio will curate and offer at no cost on a global platform that will be a respected place for civil discourse on spiritual matters. The world needs a space that Fuller Theological Seminary believes it is called to create—a place that can deepen conversation and discussion on life and faith, God and spirituality.This film, along with a wealth of other material including videos, podcasts, reflections, stories, images, embodies the goal of Fuller studio: to provide resources for individuals in pursuit of deeply formed spiritual lives. Fuller studio will house resources for individual, small group, and congregational use, drawing from its outstanding faculty and the award-winning Fuller magazine—as well as from a wider circle of voices around the country and the world, such as the conversation between Peterson, Bono, and Taylor.Fuller Seminary President Mark Labberton shares his excitement about the launch of FULLER studio, believing it will “open doors of exploration, thought, discovery, and engagement for all kinds of people in all kinds of settings—both in and outside the church?’Fuller studio users will have access to previews and downloads of introductory chapters of newly released books; teasers and featurettes for new productions; film and book study guides; and original material such as a behind-the-scenes series called in Ordinary Time of the artists, theologians, and activists that compose Fuller’s worldwide community network. It will also draw upon rich existing material from its 70-year history that has, heretofore, been accessible only by students and faculty. This openness is possible because of a combination of new technology and global connectivity: “It is my experience that people eagerly respond to a robust conversation around spirituality, which is only enhanced by global conversation partners and contributors. FULLER studio opens the doors of our considerable resources, inviting into conversation a burst of new voices and perspectives,” says Lauralee Farrer award-winning director and filmmaker who serves as the new project’s chief content and creative leader.Fuller studio is one of Fuller’s most innovative ventures of the 21. century, leveraging its global brand as a deeply theological, interdenominational thought leader to extend its reach beyond graduate education to more fully serve the needs of a world in deep pursuit of God and faith. This evolution of Fuller Seminary from traditional education to e-resource provider for spiritual formation is driven by a spirit of innovation central to Fuller’s ethos since its founding in 1947.The studio is accessible by any mobile device, and in years to come will employ new technologies and delivery systems and expand deeper into more geographies, languages, and partnerships to continue to resource those in pursuit of deeply formed spiritual lives.About Fuller Fuller Seminary, the largest multi-denominational seminary in the world, provides professional, graduate-level education through its schools of theology, psychology, and intercultural studies. With its main campus near Old Town Pasadena, and several regional campuses and online programs, Fuller serves 4,000 students from 90 countries and 110 denominations, offering five programs fully in the Korean language and four in Spanish. The seminary’s 41,000 living alumni, the largest alumni base of any seminary, serve throughout the world as ministers, nonprofit organization and corporate leaders, therapists, counselors, teachers, and in many other vocations of service and leadership. For more information, www.fuller.edu. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website last_img read more

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A rise in hate, a need to respond

first_imgArchon Fung opened the Institute of Politics forum “Trolls, Threats and Terror: Why Is Hate Rising and What Can We Do About It?” on Wednesday night with a warning.“We’re not going to be discussing a pleasant topic,” said the Kennedy School academic dean.Indeed, he observed in the panel’s most sobering conclusion, things can always get much worse than they are now — and indeed, they have been.Hate, Fung suggested, is a longstanding American tradition.“It has always been a dark part of the American political experience, from lynchings and the rise of the Klan to mass shootings to attacks on children of the BGLTQ community,” he said.While the nation’s history of 3,000 lynchings may be more frightening than anything happening in America today, the same anger and hate that fueled them may well be returning to the social forefront. Fung noted that one of the night’s two panelists, Southern Poverty Law Center president Richard Cohen, traveled to Harvard with a security director. Cohen, who has litigated a variety of important Civil Rights actions, now has to worry about assassination threats. “Such are the times we live in,” Fung said.The other panelist, former NAACP president Cornell William Brooks, reminded the audience that the NAACP itself was formed in response to a 1908 race riot in which at least a dozen African-Americans were murdered. In response to a question from co-moderator Sarah Wald, senior policy advisor at HKS, he noted that the country is facing some of the same fears of immigration that fueled the Ku Klux Klan.“America is becoming more black and brown, and more diverse in our religiosity,” Brooks said. “What we’re seeing now is not just a demographic backlash, but a post-Obama blacklash. This cannot be ducked, it’s real. The rise of the Klan was driven by a toxic brew of anti-immigrant sentiment, a kind of faux patriotism, and a view of Christianity that is in fact antithetical to the Gospel. Today we see the same forces at work. And it’s fueled by a president who is intentionally or unwittingly — and I would say intentionally — fanning the flames.”Though the panelists said they didn’t intend to take political sides, they said they couldn’t avoid talking about President Trump’s collusion — not with Russia, but with white supremacists. Cohen said that Trump’s general failure to denounce such groups brought the fringes closer to the center.“This election was unusual in that white supremacists endorsed Trump. And after he was elected, Trump went on Alex Jones’ radio show and said ‘I hear you have a really fine reputation.’ That about says it all,” he said.Brooks went a step further and suggested that Trump sometimes appeased such hate groups. “When you appoint Steve Bannon to high office, someone whose business model is propagating hate, then you have created a de facto office of legitimacy for the alt-right, i.e., white supremacy.”Wald challenged Cohen on one of his organization’s more controversial positions: naming nonviolent organizations such as the conservative Christian lobbying group Family Research Council as hate groups. Cohen replied that haters who wear business suits are no less dangerous than those who wear white sheets.“We don’t require violence,” he said. “[The Family Research Council] constantly demonizes the LBGT community and spreads propaganda against them. Some groups that we would consider hate groups have a foothold in the mainstream. And having that foothold makes them more dangerous.”Some members of the audience asked what individuals can do to oppose hate. While both panelists agreed that it can be useful to engage with haters in person and online, they said the real hope lies in larger organized efforts.“We need to get law enforcement engaged,” Brooks said. “We need to take these crises as organizational moments that build our resources, in the same way that the NAACP did.”But both panelists expressed some optimism for the future. Brooks found a source of inspiration in the community response to the church massacre in Charleston, S.C., and Cohen saw hope in Parkland, Fla., student Emma Gonzalez’s recent campaign for gun-control laws.“When she has more Twitter followers than the NRA in two weeks, something is happening,” he said. “I see change in the young people of our country. I just wish they voted.”last_img read more

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Africa Needs Inclusive Transformation to Build

first_imgLiberia’s Finance Minister Amara Konneh has said that in order for countries to build resilience to combat fragility, Africa needs a transformation based on inclusive growth for its people. Addressing a high-level panel on fragile states at the World Bank Group’s office in Washington D. C., on Thursday, Konneh said that improved management of the natural wealth, robust and effective responses to youth unemployment, urbanization, and climate change, is Africa’s best hope in tackling fragility and economic development.Standing in for Liberia’s President, Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Minister Konneh stressed the need for a new paradigm of partnership that would go beyond the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) — one that stresses shared values, ownership, and national responsibility.In a dispatch from the US, Tuesday, April 15, Konneh observed that the consolidation of peace and stability in any country is intimately linked to efforts that spur sustainable economic development and inclusive growth. “A clear example of the peace dividend can be seen in the positive transformation of Africa in the last decade,” he registered.Addressing the panel, themed: Ending Conflict and Building Peace in Africa—a Call to Action’—Konneh said peace and stability in Liberia has created the necessary conditions for investment and has engendered economic development and social transformation.“2013 was a landmark year for the people of Liberia, as we celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement that ushered in a decade of quiet peace,” he added.According to him, Liberia achieved a milestone in 2013 when she began the implementation of the National Vision 2030—the guiding principle that underpins the government’s national development initiatives over a 20-year period—out of which the government constructed its Agenda for Transformation—a medium-term economic growth and development strategy—and a Strategic Roadmap for National Healing, Peace-building and Reconciliation.Minister Konneh used the occasion to formally introduce two of the panel’s members: Sarah Cliffe, Special Advisor and Assistant Secretary-General of Civilian Capacities to the United Nations, and Callisto Madavo, Professor to the African Studies Program at Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service.The high-level event, chaired by African Development Bank President Donald Kaberuka, presented the findings of: Ending Conflict and Building Peace in Africa—A Call to Action; it comprised a panel-report on fragile states in Africa. Panelists discussed the best way to form new partnerships that support African states as they build the basis for reconciliation, peace, and prosperity.Minister Konneh shared the panel with World Bank Vice President African Region, Makhtar Diop, Jan Eliasson, Deputy Secretary-General of the United Nations, Pekka Haavisto, Minister for International Development of Finland, and Emira Peres, Minister of Finance, East-Temor and Chairperson of the G7+ member nations.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Yellow wind warning remains in effect for Donegal

first_imgDonegal has been issued a status yellow weather warning as the county is set to be lashed by heavy wind until Sunday morning.As the sun continues to shine over the county on Saturday evening, Met Eireann issued the wind warning, which will remain until 3am on Sunday.Saturday will be cool and blustery day, windy near Atlantic coasts. Mostly cloudy over the W half of the country, but some sunny breaks may occur in some E areas. Many places will be dry, but rain will develop in southwestern and western areas during the afternoon&early evening.— Met Éireann (@MetEireann) April 12, 2019 Met Eireann say winds will be strongest in coastal areas – reaching mean speeds of between 50kph and 65kph.Yellow wind warning remains in effect for Donegal was last modified: April 13th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:wind warningyellow weather warninglast_img read more

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Britain’s Chris Froome survives Tour de France early crash

first_imgChris Froome got a brutal reminder of the unpredictable nature of the Tour de France when he crashed to the ground in Sunday’s second stage, recovering to finish with torn shorts as German Marcel Kittel powered to victory at the end of a huge sprint.After being faster than his rivals in Saturday’s opening time trial, defending champion Froome was sitting comfortably near the front of the peloton when he was brought down as a Katusha rider lost his balance in front of him some 30km from the finish.Last year’s runner-up Romain Bardet (AG2R-La Mondiale) was also involved in the pile-up but the Frenchman and three-time champion Froome made it back to the main pack after a brief chase.Froome’s Sky team mate Geraint Thomas retained the overall leader’s yellow jersey at the end of the 203.5-km ride from Duesseldorf in Germany, ahead of Swiss Stefan Kueng (BMC Racing) and Kittel.”When that (a crash in the front) happens there’s nowhere to go, said Thomas. “There is no real damage at all, he (Froome) lost a bit of skin, but it’s all good. You’ve got to be super lucky to miss it and avoid it.”There was also a big scare for Bardet.”Everyone slammed on the brakes, so I was taken down by the riders in front of me. It’s never good to crash, but this was okay,” the AG2R-La Mondiale rider said.”I hope I will have a good night’s sleep. I was able to get back up on my bike very quickly, and the whole team surrounded me, so I lost no time. It could have been much worse.”advertisementBreakaway riders American Taylor Phinney (Cannondale-Drapac), nearing his best after a serious leg injury in 2014, and Frenchman Yoann Offredo (Wanty-Group Gobert), were given some breathing space as the pile-up slowed down the peloton.However the sprinters’ teams organised themselves in the finale and the duo were reined in 1.1 km from the line.MESSY FINISHKittel, of the Quick-Step Floors team, had too much horsepower for his rivals and he was half a wheel ahead of the rest in a messy finish.”I’m super happy and super proud as it was a special day since we started from Germany,” said Kittel, who now has 10 Tour stage wins to his name.”We had a plan that we could really execute but no team could. I was in a good position 500 metres from the line so I had my chance.”I’m in very good shape, in very good condition. We have definitely good chances for more stage wins.”French champion Arnaud Demare (FDJ) settled for second with another German, Andre Greipel (Lotto Soudal), in third place.Briton Mark Cavendish (Dimension Data), who is on the Tour despite suffering from the Epstein Barr virus this season, took an encouraging fourth place.Monday’s third stage will take the peloton over 212.5 km from Verviers, Belgium, to Longwy as the race enters France.Ending at the top of a short, brutal climb, it should favour the one-day classic specialists such as world champion Peter Sagan of Slovakia and Belgium’s Olympic champion Greg van Avermaet.last_img read more

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Mikmaq outraged over racist note at New Brunswick doctors office

first_imgTrina RoacheAPTN National NewsThe sign reads: “ATTN: Native Patients. Please don’t ask for tranquilizers or pain medications.”Maxine Ginnish heard about the sign and went to Dr. Allister Carter’s family practice to see for herself.“My heart broke and I had to get out of there as soon as I could because I burst into tears,” said Ginnish. “It was the first time I’d ever seen proof of such racism.”She posted of picture of the sign on Facebook. The outcry was immediate.“Good old Miramichi for you not racist at all first nation people are not the only ones that Battle addiction this makes me sick to my stomach and something needs to be done,” wrote Christine Leigh Ward, who shared the photo on Thursday.Ward’s post was shared over six hundred times in just the first few hours.Ginnish is a social worker in addictions in the Eel Ground First Nation, just a few minutes way from Miramichi. She said addiction and opioid abuse affects all cultures and communities.“So why do we have to stigmatize our people?” asked Ginnish. “Imagine if a First Nation cancer patient went in there looking for pain management. I mean, come on…It’s disheartening.”Ginnish immediately informed her community leaders about the sign and said there was a flurry of phone calls to local health authorities and Health Canada.“We need to have these discussions,” said Ginnish. “They’re uncomfortable but these things need to be said that racism is alive in our healthcare system.”George Ginnish is the chief of the Eel Ground First Nation.He was in a meeting and could not be reached for comment, but posted on Facebook: “Not really impressed with Health care providers racially profiling and denying certain medications based on race, especially when we have been trying to meet in regard to the opioid crisis in our nations and getting very few Doctors willing to meet and assist us with proactive measures.”The chief assured people that he was told the “offending note” has been taken down, but added “…we need some follow up. If you aren’t part of the solution then you are part of the problem.”Carter could not be reached for comment.Malcolm Ward, from the Metepenagiag First Nation not far from Miramichi, drove to the doctor’s office after hearing about the sign. He wanted to make sure it was taken down. But the doctor’s office was closed.“I’m pretty mad,” said Ward in a Facebook video outside the doctor’s office. “Let’s put an end to all this racism. It’s got to stop. I had enough of this. It’s 2017, folks. We have old school doctors writing notes like that, they shouldn’t even be in the business at all.”Ward is urging people to write a complaint to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New Brunswick.Dr. Shawn Burke, a representative for the College, spoke briefly on the phone with APTN but called the sign a “non-story.”Burke said it was his understanding the sign at Dr. Carter’s office had been written several years ago. He declined to comment further, saying he didn’t know enough about the situation at this time.Ginnish said it doesn’t matter if the sign is old or new.“We need to have more sensitivity and cultural awareness, especially with Canada 150,” said Ginnish. “Because we’re not celebrating. When you think of addiction from the structural viewpoint, it’s all a symptom of our colonization, our cultural loss of land, our language. And our people are being further stigmatized from seeking help.”Ginnish said community leaders in Eel Ground have already filed [email protected]last_img read more

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