Reggae connects with Windrush in London exhibition

first_imgA new exhibition has been mounted at P3 gallery in London highlighting the ways in which Jamaican music helped shape modern Britain.According to a Jamaica Observer report, Bass Culture 70/50 — a new, four-week exhibition – explores this impact. On display at Ambika P3 gallery in London, the show marks 70 years since the arrival of Empire Windrush at Tilbury Dock, Essex, and 50 years since the advent of British reggae. The exhibition, which opened on October 25 and run to November 23, feature previously unseen artwork, specially commissioned film, top industry speakers, UK reggae label pop-up showcases, live performances, 10 years of Natty, and over 70 hours of individual testimonies, linking — for the first time — the memories and experiences of black British musicians, industry practitioners, academics and audiences.The exhibition offered two opportunities to witness two exhibition exclusives. The first, a ‘Rude Boy Catwalk’, invited attendees to come dressed as they were when they first experienced a gig influenced by Jamaican music, be it ska or reggae, jungle or grime. That took place on November 9. The second is a mini film festival that will premiere Bass Culture, a 60-minute documentary mapping the impact of Jamaican music from a youth perspective.Bass Culture ResearchThe exhibition is staged by Bass Culture Research, a three-year Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project set up to explore the impact of Jamaican music in the UK. The project made headlines last year after issuing The Grime Report, which led to the withdrawal of Form 696 — a controversial risk assessment form criticized for being discriminatory and targeting genres such as grime.Soundtrack to multiculturalismMykaell Riley, principal investigator and director of the Bass Culture Music Unit at the University of Westminster, said “This is the story of the soundtrack to multiculturalism, a hidden history that is still impacting on new music.”In 1948, hundreds of Caribbean nationals embarked on a journey to the UK, having been invited, to help rebuild Britain post World War II. They arrived on passenger liner Empire Windrush which carried 1027 passengers and two stowaways on the voyage from Jamaica to London. Of this number, 802 passengers gave their last country of residence as somewhere in the Caribbean, of whom 693 intended to settle in the United Kingdom. This group has become known as the Windrush Generation.The Windrush Generation shot into the headlines earlier this year after it was made public that a number of individuals belonging to this group were being wrongly detained, denied legal rights, threatened with deportation, and, in some cases, wrongly deported from the UK by the Home Office.last_img read more

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The Stars Group deepens Right to Play commitment

first_img Related Articles ‘Deal maker’ Rafi Ashkenazi ends Flutter tenure  August 27, 2020 Submit Sue Hammett – The Stars GroupToronto TSX-listed The Stars Group Inc has confirmed that it will extend its partnership with global charity partner ‘Right to Play’ for a further two years, aiming to raise £1 million to help provide education for the world’s poorest and most vulnerable children.Founded in 2000 by Norwegian speed skating Olympian Johann Olav Koss, Right to Play is an international charity foundation developing educational and teacher training communities in countries impacted by war, poverty, and disease in Africa, Asia, the Middle East, and North America.Right to Play has acted as the charity partner of Stars Group flagship brand PokerStars since 2014, a partnership formed through its corporate fundraising programme ‘Helping Hands’.Since its inception, PokerStars players and staff have helped raise more than ‘£1.7 million in funds donated to underprivileged communities, improving education networks and resources.Last month, PokerStars was also the main sponsor of the 2019 Right To Play Sports Quiz, which took place at Leonardo Royal Hotel London St. Paul’s and raised £262,000. PokerStars has sponsored the Right To Play Sports Quiz since 2016, with the event raising more than £777,000 in total.“The Stars Group is delighted to continue its partnership with Right To Play. The vital funds raised have made and will continue to make such a positive impact to so many children around the world,” said Sue Hammett, Head of Corporate Giving at The Stars Group.“We are aiming to raise a further £1 million over the next two years with lots of exciting Helping Hands fundraising initiatives to come.”“We’re thrilled that our longstanding partner The Stars Group has committed to working with Right To Play for a further two years,” said Nikki Skipper, National Director of Right To Play UK.“Here at Right To Play, we know that play is a powerful tool to help children process the world around them, cope with severe adversity and increase their opportunities in life. With the support of partners like The Stars Group we can continue to have a huge impact on their lives and help them rise above adversity. We’re excited to work with The Stars Group employees and customers to continue to make a difference.” StumbleUpon Share Tabcorp expects $1bn hit as ‘COVID and retail contractions’ take effect August 3, 2020 Share PokerStars moves to refresh global appeal with ‘I’M IN’ August 18, 2020last_img read more

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