Watch Phil Lesh Join The Eric Krasno Band For A Beautiful “Scarlet > Fire”

first_imgFresh off the release of their Blood From A Stone album, the Eric Krasno Band brought their fall tour to the famed Terrapin Crossroads in San Rafael, CA last night. The venue is perhaps most well known for its proprietor, Grateful Dead bassist Phil Lesh. It just so happened that Lesh was on hand for the performance, and sat in for a four song run at the end of Krasno’s first set.Eric Krasno has been a frequent contributor to Phil Lesh & Friends shows of late, and the guitarist has embraced the Grateful Dead catalog with a passion. Lesh first emerged for “Ramble On Rose,” and aided in “I Second That Emotion.” Krasno’s band and Lesh then let loose on a great rendition of “Scarlet Begonias” into “Fire On The Mountain.”Check out a video of “Scarlet Begonias > Fire On The Mountain” below, courtesy of Keith Zacharski.The show of course featured a number of great original music from Krasno’s career, including choice cuts from his recent Blood From A Stone album. The show ended with a rocking encore of “Manic Depression,” sending fans home happy!Check out the full setlist below. The above photo, video, and setlist have been provided by Keith Zacharski and In The Barrel Photo.Setlist: Eric Krasno Band at Terrapin Crossroads, San Rafael, CA – 10/8/16Set One: 76, Jezebel, Please Ya, Move Over, Curse Lifter, Ramble On Rose, I Second That Emotion, Scarlet Begonias > Fire On The MountainSet Two: Get Back, Torture, On The Rise, Memphis Train, Blood From A Stone, Love Is Strong, Unconditional LoveEncore: Manic Depressionlast_img read more

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Person Posing As An Election Official Attempting To Collect Mail-In Ballots

first_imgPixabay Image.WARREN – A person claiming to be a local election official is running a scam asking to collect mail-in ballots in Warren, Pennsylvania. In an alert to residents on Friday Warren County Government officials say they received reports of an individual in the county going door-to-door stating that they are authorized to pick up people’s mail-in ballots.Officials say this is a fraudulent act and for residents to not, under any circumstances, give their ballot to anyone other than an official election worker.If this has happened to you, or you are aware of someone engaging in this activity, officials say to call 911 immediately and report it to the Pennsylvania State Police. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Green Run

first_imgCalifornia-based Arbor Collective uses sustainably sourced bamboo, natural wood veneer and poplar, respectively, in its three snowboard lines. Protective top layers are made from a 30 percent castor bean-based bioplastic and the edges are made of 60 percent recycled steel. Dear EarthTalk: I’m in the market for a new pair of skis. Are there skis being made today that are made with materials and processes that are kinder to the environment?— Scott Paxton, Rutland, VTYes, in fact ski (and snowboard) manufacturers may be among the greenest sporting goods industries out there today, given the importance to practitioners of keeping our carbon emissions down—global warming is bad for skiing and boarding—and our alpine backcountry preserved.Perhaps the biggest green change in the industry is the adoption of bamboo as a core material for both skis and snowboards. Bamboo is fast growing and doesn’t require much if any fertilizers or pesticides, so it can be produced sustainably. It is also rigid and hard to break. While most skis and snowboards on the market today still use more traditional hardwoods like beech, birch or aspen in their cores, bamboo is definitely coming on strong. Some of the leading ski makers leading the bamboo charge include K2, Salomon, Kingswood, High Society, Boomtown, Obsidian, Locomotiv, Liberty, and Blue House.Bamboo isn’t the only green innovation in skis today. Switzerland-based Movement Skis uses wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC). And Germany’s Grown Skis will recycle your old skis to make furniture and use remaining wood scraps in making new pairs of sustainably-sourced wood skis.Another German manufacturer, Völkl, eschews fiberglass entirely in its Amaruq Eco skis. The wood core is wrapped instead with wood sidewalls and topsheet. And instead of using epoxy to bind things together, Völkl uses all-organic wood resin and then protects the skis’ wood surfaces with an application of linseed oil. The metal edges employ 60 percent recycled steel.Sustainability is also the new normal in snowboards. California-based Arbor Collective uses sustainably sourced bamboo, natural wood veneer and poplar, respectively, in its three lines. Protective top layers are made from a 30 percent castor bean-based bioplastic and the edges are made of 60 percent recycled steel.Salomon, one of the industry’s leaders, has pioneered using bamboo in its snowboard cores as part of its Green Initiatives for Tomorrow program. The company’s embrace of bamboo has helped it cut down significantly on toxic fiberglass resins while reducing the plastic content of its boards by some 25 percent.Burton’s Eco Nico snowboard uses FSC-certified wood for its core, a lacquer-free top sheet, 90 percent recycled steel edges, 100 percent recycled sidewalls and a 50 percent recycled base. K2 Sports Fastplant snowboard uses bamboo for its core, and is deemed virtually unbreakable by the company. Another manufacturer, Washington-based Gnu, uses sustainably harvested Aspen trees for their snowboard cores.Many other ski and snowboard makers have jumped on the green bandwagon as well. Indeed, there’s never been a better time to do the right thing by your snowsports equipment purchasing.CONTACTS: Grown Skis, www.grownskis.com; Movement Skis, www.movementskis.com; Lucky Snowboards, www.luckysnowboards.com; Gnu Snowboards, www.gnu.com; Burton Snowboards, www.burton.com; K2 Sports, www.k2.com; Arbor Collective, www.arborcollective.com; Salomon, www.salomon.com.EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine ( www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: [email protected] Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.last_img read more

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Gov. Wolf: A Decade at $7.25? Too Little for Too Long

first_img July 24, 2019 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Economy,  Minimum Wage,  Statement Harrisburg, PA – Today marks 10 years that Pennsylvania’s minimum wage has been stuck at the embarrassingly low rate $7.25 per hour. The last minimum wage increase was on July 24, 2009, when the federal government, not the commonwealth, raised the wage. Governor Tom Wolf released the following statement about his ongoing fight to increase the minimum wage:“Today is a sad reminder that thousands of workers are struggling to get by because Pennsylvania hasn’t raised the minimum wage in a decade. While those hardworking people lag behind, 29 other states – including all of our neighbors – have raised the wage for their workers.“Pennsylvanians shouldn’t earn less than workers in West Virginia, Ohio, or New Jersey for the same job. We are a state known for our tremendous work ethic, but when jobs don’t pay enough, people can’t afford basics like food and rent. That should be unacceptable to all of us. No one who works hard should have to live in poverty.“All hardworking men and women – no matter the age – have waited too long with low wages. Increasing the minimum wage helps families, lets people work their way off public assistance, reduces the gender pay gap, and boosts spending at local businesses.“Waiting ten years for a minimum wage increase is too long. The public overwhelmingly supports raising the wage and it’s time for Harrisburg to listen. The legislature must stand with workers and raise Pennsylvania’s minimum wage.”center_img Gov. Wolf: A Decade at $7.25? Too Little for Too Longlast_img read more

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