Australian players had lost touch with reality: Steve Waugh on ball-tampering incident

first_imgSteve Waugh feels the Australian players were living in a bubble and the internal system allowed them to go far from the reality of what “an average persons thinks” about sports and things related.Australian cricket and the fans were completely thrown off back in March this year when the ball-tampering incident, involving captain Steve Smith, vice-captain David Warner and youngster Cameron Bancroft, came to light.Bancroft was caught on camera tampering with the ball and after the end of the day’s play Smith and Bancroft confronted the media admitting that the ball-tampering was a planned incident with the “leadership group” of the team involved.Warner and Smith were banned for a year by Cricket Australia in the aftermath while Bancroft received a nine-month suspension.Waugh feels the way Smith came out in the press conference and admitted to the offence, it showed that “they just didn’t realise how big a mistake it was”.”They are in a bit of a bubble and they are protected, you know they are insulated from a lot of things. They’ve got a lot of people around the side that protect them and tell them how good they are and how everything’s fantastic and sometimes you can lose touch with reality and I think that was best summed up when Steve Smith said that ‘we won’t make that same mistake again and we’ll just get on with it’,” Waugh said to ESPNcricinfo at a Laureus event in Paris.”They just didn’t realise how big a mistake it was and what they’d actually done. So that, to me, just summed up that maybe they were out of touch with what the average person thinks,” Waugh added.advertisementWaugh also said that absence of stringent punishment for ball-tampering incidents in the past encouraged players to cross the line because nobody considered it an offence.Ahead of the incident, ball-tampering was a level two offence under the ICC Code of Conduct but since the happening in Cape Town, the offence has since been elevated to a level three category, which carries a ban of up to six Tests or 12 ODIs.”You know they push the boundaries a bit by throwing the ball into the rough on the ground, which they shouldn’t do and then it’s escalated from there. It’s a shame how it got to the point that it did but I guess the authorities let that happen.”There have been captains in the past who have been done for tampering with the ball and the penalties have been very lenient so there was no penalty for doing something wrong and it was always going to get to the case where it got out of control,” Waugh further said.Also read – David Warner walks off the filed after being sledged, returns to smash 259-ball 157The ban on Smith and Warner will end in March 2019 which enables them to get to the Australian national side for the World Cup and Ashes tour. Australian batting has been missing the spark and stability of Smith and Warner since their ban.However, Waugh feels dealing with the mental part of the incident will be more important. He said that the players will have to learn to cope with people talking about the ball-tampering incident.Also read – South Africa won’t use ball-tampering scandal to sledge Australia, says du Plessis”I know that Smith will be passionate, he’s still only young, he loves cricket and he’s got that drive to get back there. His biggest challenge will be to overcome people talking about it, because the rest of his life someone will probably mention it once a day. What happened?”So he’s going to have to mentally overcome that and find a way to sort of get past that but at the end of the day he’s an outstanding cricketer and averages 60 in Test cricket, second only to Bradman over a long period of time, and he loves cricket so I’m sure he’ll come back.”Warner is a tremendous cricketer. A lot of passion, still very young. It’s really up to those guys. They’ve got to have the passion, they’ve got to have the desire but I think it’s a great chance of redemption. The Australian public will forgive and move on and they have an opportunity to really be role models to kids going forward.”(With PTI inputs)last_img read more

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Ali Wentworth To Speak At MPTFs Deal With It A Womens Conference

first_imgMPTF (Motion Picture & Television Fund) will host its fourth annual “Deal With It: A Women’s Conference” on September 25 at the Montage Beverly Hills.The conference is designed to give women in the entertainment industry practical advice for planning and dealing with life’s unexpected curveballs. This year’s keynote presentations will feature author, actress and social commentator Ali Wentworth, and author, activist and nationally recognized ageism expert Ashton Applewhite.“Deal With It showcases MPTF’s mission to support our entertainment community in living and aging well, and in helping each other in times of need,” says MPTF CEO Bob Beitcher. “I am amazed every year by the quality of speakers and panelists we attract to this event and even more by the vibrancy and richness of the conversations in the room among our attendees. Our industry members leave Deal With It with the insights, resources, and inspiration to make meaningful changes in their lives and improve their overall well-being.”The invitation-only event, which reached capacity literally just hours after the invitations were sent, features a roster of 45 speakers who are the most respected experts in their fields—many of whom are best-selling authors. Breakout panels will cover a broad spectrum of topics, including resolving personal and work-related conflicts, career transitions, caring for an aging parent, dealing with anxiety and depression, managing stress, estate planning and more.“Everyone has struggled to repair a damaged relationship, dealt with job loss, or sought that elusive sense of purpose. It is so rewarding to see first-hand how our attendees become empowered, educated and armed with the information and resources they need to deal with whatever comes their way,” says conference producer, Madelyn Hammond of Madelyn Hammond & Associates.In addition to the sessions and keynotes, the women also have an opportunity to sample products and engage with women who own their own companies or have succeeded as entrepreneurs. Sampling partners include barkTHINS, Blamtastic, McFaddy Candy Co, doTerra Essential Oils, King Soba Noodles, Wyler’s Light, Otter Pops and Kreation Organic.Corporate sponsors of the event include SAG-AFTRA, UCLA Health, DouglasElliman, Select Medical, Cedars-Sinai, Keck Medicine of USC, Providence Health & Services, City of Hope, DLA Piper, PwC, Munger, Tolles & Olson LLP, Venable LLP, HCR Wealth Advisors, Goldfarb & Luu PC, Golden Door Spa, Kreation Organic and Delta Air Lines. Media sponsors include Deadline Hollywood, The Hollywood Reporter, The Los Angeles Times, TIME and Variety.Past keynote speakers include actress and best-selling author Sandra Tsing Loh, best-selling author, screenwriter and producer Delia Ephron, Candy Chang, creator of the “Before I Die” project, and CBS Sunday Morning Contributor Nancy Giles.For more information, including a complete list of speakers and descriptions of sessions, visit mptf.com/dealwithit.last_img read more

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Mikmaq outraged over racist note at New Brunswick doctors office

first_imgTrina RoacheAPTN National NewsThe sign reads: “ATTN: Native Patients. Please don’t ask for tranquilizers or pain medications.”Maxine Ginnish heard about the sign and went to Dr. Allister Carter’s family practice to see for herself.“My heart broke and I had to get out of there as soon as I could because I burst into tears,” said Ginnish. “It was the first time I’d ever seen proof of such racism.”She posted of picture of the sign on Facebook. The outcry was immediate.“Good old Miramichi for you not racist at all first nation people are not the only ones that Battle addiction this makes me sick to my stomach and something needs to be done,” wrote Christine Leigh Ward, who shared the photo on Thursday.Ward’s post was shared over six hundred times in just the first few hours.Ginnish is a social worker in addictions in the Eel Ground First Nation, just a few minutes way from Miramichi. She said addiction and opioid abuse affects all cultures and communities.“So why do we have to stigmatize our people?” asked Ginnish. “Imagine if a First Nation cancer patient went in there looking for pain management. I mean, come on…It’s disheartening.”Ginnish immediately informed her community leaders about the sign and said there was a flurry of phone calls to local health authorities and Health Canada.“We need to have these discussions,” said Ginnish. “They’re uncomfortable but these things need to be said that racism is alive in our healthcare system.”George Ginnish is the chief of the Eel Ground First Nation.He was in a meeting and could not be reached for comment, but posted on Facebook: “Not really impressed with Health care providers racially profiling and denying certain medications based on race, especially when we have been trying to meet in regard to the opioid crisis in our nations and getting very few Doctors willing to meet and assist us with proactive measures.”The chief assured people that he was told the “offending note” has been taken down, but added “…we need some follow up. If you aren’t part of the solution then you are part of the problem.”Carter could not be reached for comment.Malcolm Ward, from the Metepenagiag First Nation not far from Miramichi, drove to the doctor’s office after hearing about the sign. He wanted to make sure it was taken down. But the doctor’s office was closed.“I’m pretty mad,” said Ward in a Facebook video outside the doctor’s office. “Let’s put an end to all this racism. It’s got to stop. I had enough of this. It’s 2017, folks. We have old school doctors writing notes like that, they shouldn’t even be in the business at all.”Ward is urging people to write a complaint to the College of Physicians and Surgeons of New Brunswick.Dr. Shawn Burke, a representative for the College, spoke briefly on the phone with APTN but called the sign a “non-story.”Burke said it was his understanding the sign at Dr. Carter’s office had been written several years ago. He declined to comment further, saying he didn’t know enough about the situation at this time.Ginnish said it doesn’t matter if the sign is old or new.“We need to have more sensitivity and cultural awareness, especially with Canada 150,” said Ginnish. “Because we’re not celebrating. When you think of addiction from the structural viewpoint, it’s all a symptom of our colonization, our cultural loss of land, our language. And our people are being further stigmatized from seeking help.”Ginnish said community leaders in Eel Ground have already filed [email protected]last_img read more

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