Experience paying dividends for UWI in Red Stripe Premier League

first_imgUWI edges closer to a semi-final berth in their debut Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) campaign, following a 2-0 win over champion, Arnett Gardens at the UWI Bowl yesterday. Inspired by their experienced team leaders in Girvon Brown upfront and Nicholas McMorris in defence, the newcomers took the lead through Brown, who tied his best tally of 12 goals for a season, when he netted a penalty after 23 minutes. They extended their lead five minutes into the second-half when McMorris assisted Anthony Greenland, after a brilliant counter attack led by the defender. Both players agreed the win was a big statement of their growth since the start of the season, when they went down 3-1 to the said Arnett team. Yesterday’s result also put them in pole position to advance to the last four. “It was a very important win. We have a couple of teams challenging us for that fourth spot so we need to keep winning. We have three games left and we are fourth. But it’s great to beat Arnett, they beat us bad in our introduction to the league so this is a promising turn around as we are not just here to participate, we are here to be a strong part of the league,” McMorris stated afterwards. Brown said: “This (win) was important. We want to get to the semi-final so it was important to come out and play good football and get the victory.” The former Boys’ Town defender, McMorris, is also pleased they are keeping clean sheets again, with the game against Arnett being the second straight after a 4-3 loss to Rivoli. “The Rivoli game was an anomaly. The field was very bad and soaked; we scored three goals and lost. But again we are keeping clean sheets and it shows the quality of the team and the defending.” He added: “Experience is always needed at the back and I am certainly one of the more experienced players in this team, so just keeping the team together as a unit, being able to read the game and do a lot of talking are the strong points I bring to the team.” Brown has put away all his five penalty attempts — among his 12 goals — and believes the expertise of the senior players in their ranks is making a massive difference. “You have experienced players like (Jamie) Robinson, (Kemar Flemming), McMorris and myself just coming through at the end of the season, so we are just working hard. The leading scorer is just three ahead and I want to get the leading scorer,” he said. UWI are fourth on 42 points, one more than Humble Lion, while Harbour View (39) and Boys’ Town are also in the race for a top four-spot. Yesterday’s Results UWI F C 2 Arnett 0 Humble Lion 2 Waterhouse 0 Boys’ Town 2 Harbour View 1 Reno FC 3 Tivoli Gardens FC 3 Rivoli FC 3 Cavalier 1 Today’s game 8:40 p.m. Montego Bay United vs Portmore United at Montego Bay Sports Complexlast_img read more

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Contract workers to be integrated into permanent public service – Harmon

first_imgPublic service CoI– report handed over to Opposition Leader, House Speaker Minister of State Joseph Harmon said Government is currently in the process of streamlining contract workers to fit them into the permanent structure of the public service.He was at the time speaking to journalists following the handing over of the final report of the investigation into the public service to Speaker of the National Assembly, Dr Barton Scotland.According to Harmon, Government has decided to go this route based on recommendations coming out of the recent Commission of Inquiry (CoI) into the Public Service.Harmon told journalists that more than 100 persons who were employed on a contractual basis are now part of the regular public service. According to him, Government is also working to ensure that no significant hiccups are experienced with the change.Just recently, chartered accounting firm Ram and McRae pointed out that too much strain was being placed on the public coffers with the employment of contracted workers. It made the significant finding following the delivery of this year’s national budget.The firm noted the Ministry of the Presidency’s increase in contract employees from 298 in 2015 to 505 in 2016, as well as an increase in the cost of wages and salaries for contract employees from $142 million to $798 million.Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo receives a copy of the CoI report from Minister of State Joseph HarmonOpposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo receives a copy of the CoI report from Minister of State Joseph HarmonThe firm pointed to the significant increases in the item which showed the allocation to the Office of the Prime Minister, with the cost of wages and salaries for contracted employees rising from $21 million to $82 million.It also addressed the Ministry of Public Infrastructure which saw an increase from $9 million to $51 million in a particular programme and $182 million to $533 million under its Public Works Programme.The firm had said that the practice was “not healthy” for the country and placed a strain on Article 38 of the Constitution which requires the public service to be free from political influence.Meanwhile, following discussions at Cabinet level on Tuesday, Minister of State Joseph Harmon on Wednesday presented copies of the final report of the Inquiry into the public service to House Speaker, Dr Barton Scotland and Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo.Government in September 2015 established the three-member Commission to investigate, report on, and make recommendations on the role, functions, recruitment process, remuneration and conditions of service for public servants. The Commission was also expected to determine measures to improve the efficiency of the public service and have a detailed examination of how salaries and wages are determined and allocated.According to Harmon, Cabinet is now expected to consider the recommendations made by the Commission after which a pronouncement will be made.The Minister said copies of the report will also be delivered to the President of the Guyana Public Service Union, the Trade Union Congress and the Federation of Independent Trade Unions of Guyana.Minister Harmon on behalf of the Government of Guyana and President David Granger expressed gratitude to the Public Service CoI Commissioners. Considering the Terms of Reference set out by President Granger, Harmon said he believes an “excellent” job was done. Harmon also spoke of Government’s plans to establish the Public Service Staff College.“We’ve started to interview persons for the college and have identified the staff for the college – it’s just now a question of having the actual location and we’re working on that,” the Minister stated.The Public Service Staff College campus will be at Ogle, East Coast Demerara (ECD). It will commence operations when infrastructural works on the buildings are completed and all equipment acquired.According to Harmon, the Staff College is an important component of Government’s reform of the public service.last_img read more

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Yellow wind warning remains in effect for Donegal

first_imgDonegal has been issued a status yellow weather warning as the county is set to be lashed by heavy wind until Sunday morning.As the sun continues to shine over the county on Saturday evening, Met Eireann issued the wind warning, which will remain until 3am on Sunday.Saturday will be cool and blustery day, windy near Atlantic coasts. Mostly cloudy over the W half of the country, but some sunny breaks may occur in some E areas. Many places will be dry, but rain will develop in southwestern and western areas during the afternoon&early evening.— Met Éireann (@MetEireann) April 12, 2019 Met Eireann say winds will be strongest in coastal areas – reaching mean speeds of between 50kph and 65kph.Yellow wind warning remains in effect for Donegal was last modified: April 13th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:wind warningyellow weather warninglast_img read more

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Leeds boss ‘plans transfer raid on QPR’

first_imgLeeds United manager Neil Warnock has again been linked with QPR trio Paddy Kenny, Clint Hill and Shaun Derry.The Sunday Mirror say goalkeeper Kenny is top of the former R’s boss’ wanted list for the summer.Warnock is said to be keen to take Kenny to Leeds.Warnock is also said to want Clint Hill and Shaun Derry. All three men have played under him at their previous clubs.Hill’s Loftus Road contract expires at the end of the season, while Derry, who had a three-year spell at Leeds, has been linked with a return since Warnock took over.Kenny is under contract until 2013 and talks over a new deal, which were pencilled in for the start of February, have still not taken place.Related West London Sport stories:Hughes rules out further contract talks (3 April)Defender resigned to leaving QPR (8 February)Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

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Are Starfish Eyes Missing Links?

first_imgStarfish are found to have “primitive” image-forming eyes on the tips of their arms.  Do these represent links between simple and complex eyes?  Some reporters seem to think so.Deborah MacKenzie at New Scientist leapt at the opportunity to score one for Darwin:We have known about the sensors that starfish have at the ends of their arms for 200 years, but no one knew whether they are real eyes that form images or simply structures that detect changes in light intensity.We finally have an answer: they appear to act as real eyes. The discovery is another blow to creationist arguments that something as complex as a human eye could never evolve from simpler structures.In a similar vein, PhysOrg asked if it is a “missing link in eye evolution.”  Dr. Andrews Garm at the University of Copenhagen experimented on blue sea stars.  When deprived of the photosensors, starfish wandered aimlessly, but their fellow stars with intact sensors migrated toward the coral, where the food source is.  The article contains photos of the starfish and its photoreceptors.Surprisingly, after 200 years of knowing these photoreceptors exist, nobody had checked to see if they are capable of providing directional cues to the animals.  New Scientist said they are “good enough to show the way home” but more primitive than the compound eyes in arthropods.  MacKenzie continued the evolutionary angle:In evolutionary terms, says Garm, it is interesting because starfish eyes are structurally close in form to the hypothesised first image-forming eyes.For instance, light receptors in more advanced eyes are built either out of modified cytoplasmic projections called microvilli, or out of filament-shaped cell organelles called cilia. Starfish eyes contain both structures, so “have features that look a bit ancestral“, says [Dan-Eric] Nilsson [Lund University].“This shows what visual task drove this important step in eye evolution,” says Garm. “Navigation towards large stationary objects – here the reef – that were preferred habitats.” In other words, he thinks our eyes may have first evolved so we could find our way home.PhysOrg said that the structure on the blue sea star, “except for the lack of true optics, resembles arthropod compound eye.”  Neither article mentioned the whole-body lenses on brittle stars, another echinoderm (8/23/01).In other echinoderm news, PhysOrg reported that some starfish are able to shed arms to prevent overheating.  Nature News reported a Cambrian fossil that they claim is an early echinoderm.  It lacked arms, but had five-fold symmetry.  It “resembled an egg with its tapered end planted in the sea floor,” the article said.  “Its mouth opened upward and its body spiralled down.”Nice try, Darwin Party, but no score.  Starfish are not ancestral to arthropods or vertebrates.  Eyes appeared abruptly in separate phyla during the Cambrian explosion, as seen in molluscs, jellyfish, comb jellies, and arthropods (trilobites and the Burgess Shale animals), and in some extinct phyla.  Trilobite eyes were very complex but appeared abruptly like all the others.   If starfish represented a transitional form, why do starfish still exist hundreds of millions of years later with the same “primitive” eyes?  Where’s the evolution?The authors made another tactical blunder in their evolutionary tale.  “Visual tasks” do not “drive evolution.”  You can’t drive an aimless mechanism on a random walk.  Eyes don’t evolve “so we could find our way home.”  That makes no sense theoretically or evidentially.  All living things have some common “tasks” including finding their habitat.  Why don’t plants have eyes?  Why don’t seeds have eyes so they can find the right soil?  Many plants and animals could have benefited from sight but didn’t “evolve eyes.”  You can’t use “evolve” as an active verb.  Evolution is whatever happens, without anyone guiding it or needing it.  Once again we see evolutionists misusing and misunderstanding their own theory.The fact is, each animal has the senses it needs for its place in the ecology.  Everything is equipped for its role.  The story should have been that starfish are more amazing than previously thought, not that they represent a missing link.  Maybe the evolutionists are panicking at the release of Stephen Meyer’s best-selling book, Darwin’s Doubt, laying out the case for intelligent design as seen in the Cambrian fossil record.  For a shorter explanation of the Cambrian explosion, see Illustra’s film Darwin’s Dilemma. (Visited 40 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Mbeki slams apartheid lawsuits

first_img16 April 2003President Thabo Mbeki has slammed the lawsuits being brought in the US against companies on behalf of victims of apartheid, warning that judgments handed down in foreign courts will not be honoured in South Africa.Addressing Parliament during a debate on the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) report, Mbeki said it was “completely unacceptable … that matters that are central to the future of our country should be adjudicated in foreign courts, which bear no responsibility for the well-being of our country and the observance of the perspective contained in our Constitution of the promotion of national reconciliation”.A number of South African-based companies, including mining giants Anglo American and De Beers and petrochemicals firm Sasol, have been named in a reparations claim being brought by controversial US lawyer Ed Fagan.The government had previously said that it neither supported nor opposed such suits. Mbeki’s comments on Tuesday were more forthright, however, with the President assuring Parliament that the government was not and never would be party to this litigation.Senior government ministers echoed Mbeki, with Trade and Industry Minister Alec Erwin saying that the government was “contemptuous” of the lawsuits, and Justice Minister Penuell Maduna noting that South African issues such as reparation and justice could not be solved through legal action by courts in the United States.Maduna called on people rather to make contributions to the reparation trust fund which the government had established for reparations to apartheid victims, as recommended by the TRC report. “There is a call that has been made, that if you are able to do anything about the plight of the majority out there, do it”, Maduna said.Mbeki also said on Tuesday that the government had rejected the TRC’s recommendation of a once-off “wealth tax” for South African companies found to have benefited from apartheid.However, Mbeki said that business, just like any other sector of the population, had a role to play in reconstructing the country, and should contribute to the reparations fund, that would be managed by government and representatives from business.Mbeki says no to ‘wealth tax’The government will also provide a once-off R30 000 grant to about 20 000 individuals identified by the TRC as deserving reparation for suffering under apartheid.The amount comes to about R660-million, and is in addition to more than R50-million government has already paid out, as an interim measure, to 16 500 of the 18 800 victims identified as needing urgent relief.Grants for apartheid victimsSouthAfrica.info reporterlast_img read more

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Remembering Lucky Dube, ten years on

first_imgIn October 2007, one of South Africa’s greatest musical sons died. Celebrate the life and art of reggae artist Lucky Dube with five of his greatest songs. Lucky Dube was one of South Africa’s best known and most successful musicians. He died on 18 October 2007. (Image: Gallo Music South Africa)CD AndersonLucky Dube was an icon of South African music. The singer-songwriter singlehandedly put South African reggae on the international music map. With numerous successful and critically acclaimed albums, an electrifying stage presence and as an outspoken commentator on political and cultural issues of the day, by 2007 Dube was at the peak of his career and a respected elder of South African music.His death that year, killed during a hijacking outside his Johannesburg home, was both shocking and tragic. Millions of South Africans mourned the unnecessary death of a true musical legend.Born in Ermelo, Mpumalanga, in 1964, Dube found his love for music in school choirs and short-lived mbaqanga (Zulu pop) garage bands, before becoming a devout Rastafarian and dedicated reggae musician.Inspired by Jamaican musicians Jimmy Cliff and Peter Tosh, Dube mixed the latter’s socio-political messaging with the former’s pop music sensibility. His second album, Think About The Children, released in 1985, was the first of many hugely successful albums he would record over the next 20 years. In 1993, his album Victims sold more than one million copies, and he found audiences across the rest of Africa, in the Caribbean and Europe, where he toured prolifically.Lucky Dube was one of South Africa’s best known and most successful musicians. He died on 18 October 2007. (Image: Gallo Music South Africa)His music helped spread the popularity of reggae around the world and bridge the cultural divides in the African diaspora, particularly for fans in Europe looking for a common spiritual reconnection to Africa. Asked shortly before his death what inspired his music, Dube answered: “People… looking at people, watching [their] movements, the things they do. My songs are [about] real-life situations and experiences.”During the height of Dube’s popularity, in the last days of apartheid in the late 1980s and early 1990s, his music would often be the soundtrack of a country in change. With lyrics that celebrated humanity and dignity, and inspired many to reach across the cultural divide, Dube’s music was considered a great reconciliator of South Africans from all walks of life.Not to mention that reggae music itself, with its catchy melodies and addictive rhythms, is guaranteed to always get everyone dancing.At heart a family man who shunned the excesses of the music business, Dube professed his pride in and love for his wife Zanele Mdluli and their two children, Nkulee and Thokozani, who both followed their father’s footsteps into music after his death.Lucky Dube was one of South Africa’s best known and most successful musicians. He died on 18 October 2007. (Image: Gallo Music South Africa)To commemorate the ten-year anniversary of his death, Dube’s long-time recording company, Gallo Music South Africa, has released a double-album compilation titled The Times We’ve Shared. It features not only his biggest hits but also three previously unreleased songs as well exclusive recordings some of his most iconic live performances.Click here to listen and purchase the album. Relive and remember the musical genius of Lucky Dube with five of his greatest songs below: Source: Gallo Music South Africa, News24, South African History OnlineWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Are Crowdsourcing and Outsourcing No-Nos For Startups?

first_imgchris cameron Related Posts Chances are, if you’ve called customer service to enough companies, you’ve come across a representative who works for a call-center which has been contracted to handle a comapany’s account. Large corporations that don’t want to employ their own agents and maintain their own facilities will often outsource customer service to a third party, which at times can mean a company in another part of the world. Bangalore, India was famously portrayed for its role in call-center outsourcing in the Thomas Friedman book The World Is Flat, servicing many large American companies. But tools like outsourcing or crowdsourcing are not always beneficial to every breed of company.A recent post on crowdsourcing from the startup blog Pluggd.in, and a Forbes article about outsourcing have both warned startups of the possible complications of both. Crowdsourcing is similar to outsourcing in that a task normally conducted by an employee is shifted to a third party, but in this case the job is performed by numerous people, not just one. If I wanted to outsource the web design of my new site, I might hire a graphic designer, but if I wanted to crowdsource, I could use a service like crowdSPRING to host a competition and pick from a whole slew of designs and designers.While crowdsourcing and outsourcing are fundamentally different, they share similar risks, especially for startups and small businesses. As the Pluggd.in article suggests, more mature companies might be better candidates for this type of work. “Startups do not fit the ‘business case’ that could garner qualified social feedback for its product from the crowd,” the article argues. “The product engagement within the market has not been long enough, and more often than not the sample size of [the] crowd may not be representative at all.”The idea here is that crowdsourcing works better when the audience participating is more aware of the product in the market. With startups, crowds may not have the most accurate sense of the best direction for an idea, especially one that is new and innovative. That’s what you, the entrepreneur, are for. The article warns startups to not rely too heavily on information gathered from the crowd in terms of which features to keep, which to throw away, which to add, or any other kind of information. Startups should always listen to their users, but work with them, not for them.Along the lines of do-it-yourself, the Forbes article chronicles an unfortunate tale of outsourcing gone wrong. In my interview this week with Danny Wong of Blank Label, he pointed me to this article based on an interview with his co-founder, Fan Bi. In it, Bi warns startups looking to outsource design and development to cheaper labor pools should think twice before doing so.“It was too good of an opportunity to pass up when we were trying to bootstrap our business. Getting the work done for a quarter of the price was tempting,” says Bi. “The team abroad wanted quick and dirty projects that can be turned around quickly and get them paid. They had no real ownership.”The outsourced work came back looking “terrible”, he says. The designers and coders they had outsourced had no passion or personal investment in the work they were doing, and it showed in the quality. For startups, it seems that finding a partner or employee who is just as passionate about the company and its vision is well worth the extra money for the quality they bring with them. Entrepreneurs are highly motivated and driven people, and companies succeed when a group of passionate people set their sights on one goal. Outsourcing and crowdsourcing seem to go against that mantra, and one could argue that these are lazy roads to go down for a startup. But are crowdsourcing and outsourcing a pair of techniques that should be avoided outright by startups? Or are there times when a startup can employ one of these tactics? Let us know how you feel about this issue in the comments.Photo by Flickr user Vilma.com. A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img Tags:#start#startups 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Market Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostinglast_img read more

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