West Ham pre-season: Friendlies, transfers & PL fixtures

first_imgThe 2018-19 season may still be fresh in the mind but for West Ham, they will already be plotting how to improve their standing come 2019-20.Manuel Pellegrini took the Hammers to their best Premier League finish since 2016, guiding them to 10th with a points haul of 52, claiming victories over top six opposition such as Tottenham and Arsenal.However, a dismal cup run that saw them eliminated in the fourth round of both the Carabao Cup and FA Cup – to Wimbledon and Spurs respectively – means there is still much room for improvement. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Emery out of jail – for now – as brilliant Pepe papers over Arsenal’s cracks What is Manchester United’s ownership situation and how would Kevin Glazer’s sale of shares affect the club? Ox-rated! Dream night in Genk for Liverpool ace after injury nightmare Messi a man for all Champions League seasons – but will this really be Barcelona’s? Ahead of the upcoming campaign,  Goal  takes a look at the Hammers’ pre-season friendly schedule, the club’s transfer activity and when their Premier League push begins again.West Ham pre-season fixtures Date Match Time (UK / US ET) Venue Jul 11 SCR Altach 4:30pm / 11:30am Cashpoint Arena, Altach Jul 17 Manchester City* 1:30pm / 8:30am Nanjing Olympic Sports Centre, Nanjing Jul 20 Newcastle United 11am / 1.30pm Hongkou Stadium, Shanghai Jul 27 Fulham 3pm / 10am Craven Cottage, London *Part of the 2019 Premier League Asia Trophy West Ham kick off their 2019-20 pre-season preparations with a quick trip to Austria enroute to a spell in China, before they return home to London for a derby encounter.Their first friendly match is against SCR Altach on July 11, in the western state of Vorarlberg, before they head east for the 2019 Premier League Asia Trophy.There, they will face Manchester City on July 17 in Nanjing – and depending on their result, they will subsequently face either Newcastle United or Wolves in either the final or a third-place match on July 20They then return back to the United Kingdom, when they make a short trip across the capital to face Fulham , who are preparing for life back in the Championship, on July 27.West Ham 2019-20 transfer activity Manuel Pellegrini West Ham UnitedWest Ham have already announced that they will release a dozen players, who will bid farewell to London Stadium ahead of the new campaign.Only one player so far has found a new home, with academy product Jay Mingi making the short trip to Chalton Athletic.That means major faces like Andy Carroll and Adrian are on the lookout for a new club following the conclusion of their careers with the Hammers.There has already been an incoming arrival however, with the Irons confirming that they have signed goalkeeper Roberto from Espanyol.A Spain youth international, the 33-year-old has been bounced around La Liga as well as Portugal and Greece for much of his career and will hope to make a more permanent home in London upon his arrival.The club completed the record signing of forward Sebastian Haller from Eintracht Frankfurt in July.Transfer activity in Position Player Transferred from Fee Date GK Roberto Espanyol Free Jul 1 MF Pablo Fornals Villareal £24m Jun 14 GK David Martin Millwall Free Jun 3 FW Sebastien Haller Eintracht Frankfurt £45 Jul 17 Transfer activity out Position Player Transferred to Fee Date GK Adrian Released N/A Jul 1 DF Mason Barrett Released N/A Jul 1 FW Andy Carroll Released N/A Jul 1 MF Kevin Dalipi Released N/A Jul 1 MF Moses Makasi Released N/A Jul 1 FW Toni Martínez Released N/A Jul 1 MF Jay Mingi Charlton Athletic N/A Jul 1 MF Samir Nasri Released N/A Jul 1 DF Vashon Neufville Released N/A Jul 1 DF Josh Pask Released N/A Jul 1 FW Odysseas Spyridis Released N/A Jul 1 MF Noha Sylvestre Released N/A Jul 1 West Ham 2019-20 Premier League fixtures West Ham discovered their Premier League schedule on the morning of June 13, when the 2019-20 season fixtures are released.Games will kick off on August 10 with their entry into the Carabao Cup later that month when they join the competition in the second round.The Hammers will get their Premier League season underway against Manchester City at 12:30pm on August 10 at the London Stadium. Check out Goal’s Premier League 2019-20 fantasy football podcast for game tips, debate and rivalries.last_img read more

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From the Gods to the Table: Chef Guas and Mead

first_img Mezcal Unión Takes a People-First Approach to Making Spirits Could a Mead Spritzer Succeed in the Seltzer World? Editors’ Recommendations America’s Oldest City Has a Super-Modern Dining and Drinking Scene How 2 Noma Alumni Brought Their Flavorful Spirits Line to the United States Chef David GuasHoney is a magical thing: it’s a natural antiseptic, a healthy sweetener, and it never spoils– hell, honey found in ancient pharaohs’ tombs is still edible. And now bees and American beekeepers are getting a helping hand from renowned chef David Guas as he takes mead from the gods and gives it back to the people at both the Capitol Hill and Arlington, VA locations of his restaurant, Bayou Bakery.Mead has been around for thousands of years, drunk by most of history’s heavy hitters, the Greeks, Romans, the Chinese, Vikings, it’s even immortalized in fictional works as the drink of deities and warriors. Mead is made by fermenting honey, adding water and sometimes spices or herbs, and traditionally, is a very sweet wine-like drink.Guas calls it “…the next new old thing,” as brewers and vintners rediscover and update the drink. Take Charm City Meadworks, the Baltimore-based mead supplier Guas handpicked to serve at Bayou: James Boicourt, co-owner of Charm City, kept bees in college and began incorporating that honey into his home-brews. When he met the other side of that “co” in co-owner Andrew Geffken who had his own love of home-brewing, Charm City was officially born and mead, infused with local herbs and spices, has never tasted so good. Guas cleverly uses Charm City’s variety of meads, ranging from a wine like libation to canned, almost beer-like mead, not only as drinks and cocktails, but even as a braising liquid for meat. The Melon-Aide Cocktail Guas created is the perfect refreshing, unique summer drink: a honeydew base with Charm City Mead.Honeybees are the unsung heros of this ancient beverage: they may be a nuisance you try to avoid (or even prevent), but bees are actually vital to ecosystems and farming. While producing honey, they also pollinate around a third of the food we eat. Those are some industrious bees and they struggle for survival, helped along by dedicated beekeepers.Chef Guas tending to hivesAs a spokesperson for the National Honey Board, Guas is a natural ally for this misunderstood insect. He supports local honey makers who are struggling in their own right: illegal imports can severely undercut American-made honey, making it difficult for US producers to compete. (However the National Honey Board does represent both large and small honey producers and companies, including legally imported honey). Guas gets his hands sticky each year, making the time to help tend to hives of the local producers he’s formed relationships with. There’s even a “Sticky Station” in his Bayou Bakeries with over 30 of his favorite types of honey from across the United States. That’s 30 out of over 300 types of honey that exist, so keep tasting.By highlighting honey in his menus, and now with the exciting and novel mead, chef David Guas brings honey and the importance of supporting bees and their keepers alive in a delicious way. 10 Best Whiskies for Irish Coffee last_img read more

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If we take action now we can address climate change and build

10 Things You Need to Know About COP21. Credit: United NationsUN News Centre: What is the best outcome possible from COP21?Janos Pasztor: We are expecting a package of outcomes and it will have four elements – they’re interrelated but they’re different. The first one will be the national plans for climate change of each country, for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. Those are plans that are developed “bottom up” by the countries – this is what they can do. The second element will be the actual agreement. It will contain the rules of the game on how countries will assess the impact of the totality of the national plans on the objective to keep warming below 2 degrees. And then they will review and assess what it takes to raise the ambition to make sure that we keep below those 2 degrees of global warming. That will be the core of that agreement. The third part is climate finance. All of this will require financing, public and private finance, and there will be some parts of this package of finance that will go into the agreement. And the fourth is the action agenda – a collection of actions on the ground to do either mitigation or adaption, and it’s to demonstrate that it’s already possible, it’s already happening and to showcase what are the good partnerships between private sector, public sector and civil society to actually do the work on the ground. UN News Centre: What are the main challenges ahead? If we take action now, we can address climate change as we move toward a low-emission economy and build a sustainable future. The more we delay, the more we will pay. Janos Pasztor: The main challenge ahead is to negotiate the agreement. That’s the bottom line. And we have very little time. In fact, the last negotiation week finished recently in Bonn [Germany]. What we now have left in terms of formal negotiation time is only that period during the actual Conference of the Parties [COP] in Paris, the first two weeks of December. UN News Centre: Can you give us an overview of key issues that are left to be negotiated – what different countries are claiming?Janos Pasztor: There are quite a few of those and the most important one seems to be related to what is referred to as the differentiation – the differentiation between the developed and developing countries. Some countries would like no formal differentiation and they would like all rules to apply to everybody, every country, with maybe a certain flexibility to reflect the capacities of different countries. Just days away from the kick-off of the 21st United Nations climate change conference — widely known as COP21 — the UN is reminding its main actors that this conference must be a turning point for climate action.Beginning on Monday in France’s capital, Paris, world leaders will be negotiating a new climate change agreement that aims to keep global average temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit) — beyond which climate experts say there will be irreversible impacts. The two-week conference, the 21st Meeting of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), also aims to send a loud and clear signal to citizens, markets and the private sector that the transformation of the global economy is inevitable, beneficial, and already under way. To find out more about COP21 and the UN’s expectations, the UN News Centre met with Janos Pasztor, the UN Assistant Secretary-General on Climate Change. Since January, Mr. Pasztor’s work has focused on supporting efforts towards a new climate agreement and mobilizing global climate action on the ground.Climate change affects us all, but our actions affect climate change.UN News Centre: What is the importance of the upcoming 21st United Nations climate change conference – COP21?Janos Pasztor: There are at least two major points. First of all, if we have a good agreement it will allow us to move towards a low-carbon, low-emission future, where there are lots of opportunities for new technology developments and new ways of organizing ourselves. That is an opportunity we must take. Secondly, climate change is already happening. The impacts are already visible. If we take action now, we can address climate change as we move toward a low-emission economy and build a sustainable future. The more we delay, the more we will pay. UN News Centre: Why do we need to keep the global average temperature rise below 2 degrees Celsius? Janos Pasztor: If we allow warming to go beyond that, scientists tell us there are likely to be potential irreversible impacts on people, on natural ecosystems, and therefore, on the economies of the world. Now the 2 degrees is not a very hard level. Many are saying that it actually has to be much less than 2 degrees for the small island developing countries whose land might become completely inundating with a sea level rise. Already 2 degrees is way too much. So, it must be remembered that when we talk of 2 degrees, it is the maximum. It must be kept as much as possible below that. Interview with Janos Pasztor, UN Assistant Secretary-General on Climate Change. Credit: United NationsOther countries would like to maintain the existing grouping of countries in the Convention to developed and developing countries, and then have rules that refer to these different groups. So that’s quite important because it has implications, not just on the conceptual issue of having divisions like that, but in terms of financing.But there are other challenges – such as climate finance. Developed countries have committed to providing $100 billion dollars per year by 2020 to developing countries. The $100 billion doesn’t have to be on the table in Paris, but what does need to be on the table is a politically credible mobilization trajectory towards this $100 billion. Some progress was made in October, but there is still work to do and there are still announcements that hopefully will be made by some countries. So these are just two examples of difficult issues that still need to be resolved but there are others as well. UN News Centre: You mentioned the last round of negotiations in Bonn. What came out of those discussions?Janos Pasztor: What we have is a document that has grown in size. While the actual size doesn’t matter – what matters is the content – clearly the longer the text, the more time it takes to negotiate and that’s our biggest challenge. The text is some 55 pages long and it will take some time to go through the different elements. What we ended up with at the Bonn negotiation is that countries added into the original draft which was much shorter – specific things that they wanted to see in the final text and there wasn’t enough time to negotiate all that in Bonn. So we still have lots of options in there and those will still need to be negotiated both in informal discussions and during COP21.UN News Centre: What is the significance of COP21 in light of the new 2030 Development Agenda, and how predominantly does climate change figure in it?Janos Pasztor: The new Sustainable Development Agenda—or Agenda 2030 – is extremely important for the implementation of the climate agreement. First, we have a goal – Goal 13 – which focuses on climate change. But what the other goals are even more important. There are 12 goals [out of 17] that have very specific climate related targets on energy, on forests, on food security, on education – these are all things that will feed into successfully implementing the climate agreement. The main challenge ahead is to negotiate the agreement.But what is really important is that if we don’t achieve the 2 degree objective, then none of the Sustainable Development Goals can be achieved. And in order to achieve the less than 2 degree objective, we need to do all the things that are in the Sustainable Development Goals. That’s the challenge but that is the beauty: these two different processes that are negotiated through separate processes are now coming together at the level of implementation. And this is where the UN system has a very important role also, because we are there to support Member States to help them to address these issues in a coherent and integrated way. UN News Centre: Just days ahead of COP21, what is your message to world leaders?Janos Pasztor: World leaders have a very important role in guiding their ministers and negotiators on the broad economic implications of climate change and actions about climate change. So their role for the negotiations is very important. If they don’t give clear guidance to the negotiators then they don’t know what to agree upon. So that is why the UN Secretary-General has been much engaged with Heads of States and Governments so that they own this process and clearly guide their ministers and their negotiators. UN News Centre: What do you want to convey to the public?Janos Pasztor: Climate change affects us all, but our actions affect climate change – all of us. We are all responsible for what we do in our daily lives – how we vote, how we engage, how we run our companies, how we run our civil society organizations. We all need to be conscious of this, and we all need to do our [email protected] only screen and (min-width: 760px), screen9 {#PhotoHolder3 #PhotoCrop { max-height: 770px; /* sets max-height value for all standards-compliant browsers */ width: 134%; margin-left:-161px; margin-top: -330px;}#story-headline{ font-size: 3.6em; line-height: 1.2em; color:#fff; position: relative; top: 200px; xtext-align:center; text-shadow: 1px 1px 3px rgba(0,0,0,0.8); width:45%; xmargin-left:55%;}}#sidebar {display:none;} div#story-content .span8 {width:100% !important} #fullstory p { font-size: 14px; line-height: 1.6em;}strong { font-size: 1.2em; line-height: 1.7em; xfont-family:Georgia, “Times New Roman”, Times, serif;}blockquote { font-size: 1.2em; line-height: 1.5em; font-style:italic;}.videoWrapper { position: relative; padding-bottom: 56.25%; /* 16:9 */ padding-top: 25px; height: 0;}.videoWrapper iframe { position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 100%; height: 100%;} read more

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Ohio State rolls over Penn State 6314

Ohio State players pile up on Penn State running back, Zach Zwinak (28). OSU won against Penn State, 63-14, at Ohio Stadium Oct. 26. Credit: Ritika Shah / Asst. photo editor The Ohio State football team extended the nation’s longest winning streak to 20 games Saturday, defeating Big Ten rival Penn State 63-14.“I like where we’re at as a team,” OSU coach Urban Meyer said after the game. “I’m very pleased with arguably our best team win.”OSU wasted no time getting on the board, as senior running back Carlos Hyde found the end zone from two yards out on its first drive to put the Buckeyes up, 7-0 just 2:17 into the game.The Buckeyes (8-0, 4-0) found the end zone on the ground a few drives later, but this time it was junior quarterback Braxton Miller, who scored from 39 yards out.Miller found pay dirt again on OSU’s next drive after Penn State freshman quarterback Christian Hackenberg threw an interception to senior safety C.J. Barnett. The six-yard scamper made it 21-0 OSU.Following a three-and-out by Penn State, Miller hit senior wide receiver Chris Fields in the end zone from three yards out to extend OSU’s lead to 28-0. It was Fields’ fifth touchdown reception of 2013.Miller said after the game he is “very comfortable” with the passing game right now.“I know what I’m doing and (what the) defensive coverage (is) and I know where the guys is going to be,” Miller said. “It’s exciting to see a guy with the ball in his hand do something with it.”The Nittany Lions (4-3, 1-2) got on the board on their ensuing possession, as Hackenberg hit graduate senior Brandon Felder for a 12-yard touchdown to make the score 28-7.Freshman running back Dontre Wilson nearly took the following kickoff back for a touchdown, returning it to the Penn State 45 yard line. Two plays later, Hyde took a handoff from Miller 39 yards untouched for his second score of the game.OSU would score one more time before the half, as Miller found senior wide receiver Corey “Philly” Brown from 25 yards out with just three seconds left. OSU led 42-7 at the break.Miller found Wilson out of the backfield for a 29 yard touchdown on OSU’s second drive of the second half to extend the lead to 49-7.“I just love where Braxton’s at right now,” Meyer said. “I love the fact that he’s acting like a quarterback…I felt like he was an athlete playing quarterback a year ago. Feel like he’s a quarterback that’s a really good athlete now.”Redshirt-senior quarterback Kenny Guiton entered the game at the end of the Buckeyes’ next drive, taking the snap with Miller lined up at wide receiver and running two yards up the middle for a score.Guiton’s second touchdown of the night, this one from 11 yards out, made the score 63-7.Penn State junior receiver Allen Robinson reversed the field twice on his way to a 65-yard touchdown against the OSU second-team defense to make the score 63-14 in favor of the Buckeyes.OSU racked up 686 total yards of offense in the 63-14 win, the third-most yards gained in school history.Meyer said beating a team like Penn State by such a large margin “helps” to impress across the country, but it was not what was on the team’s mind going into the game with the Nittany Lions.“That was not certainly our mindset,” Meyer said. “Our  mindset is find a way to win this game against a very talented team. What we’re worried about is find a way to win the game. And things usually work out.”Next up the Buckeyes are set to travel to West Lafayette, Ind., to take on Purdue. Kickoff is set for noon. read more

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Praveen Halappanavar Savitas treatment was horrendous barbaric and inhumane

first_imgWe were always kept in the dark. If Savita would [have] known her life was at risk, she would have jumped off the bed to seek another hospital. We were never told about it. It is horrendous, it is barbaric and inhumane the way Savita was treated in that hospital.Mr Halappanavar said there were still questions to be answered as to why Savita died.“I am optimistic and hope for the best,” he added. Addressing questions about further legal proceedings, he said he would “sit back and consider” but indicated that he would look at taking additional actions.Listen to Praveen Halappanavar and his solicitor react to the inquest verdict (Click here if viewing on a mobile device): THE HUSBAND OF Savita Halappanavar has said he will continue in his pursuit of the truth as to how and why his wife died.Following the inquest into the 31-year-old’s death, Praveen Halappanavar said he has a responsibility to Savita and her family “to get to the bottom of the truth”.Speaking outside Galway County Hall, he recalled a conversation with Savita’s father who told him that someone must take responsibility for a patient in a hospital.“The care she received was in no way different to staying home,” he told reporters. “So medicine is all about preventing the natural history of the disease and improving patient’s life and health and look what they did. She was just left there to die. Savita Halappanavar died on 28 October of septic shock, E.coli in the bloodstream and a miscarriage at 17 weeks. The inquest today found that there was medical misadventure relating to the management of her treatment. The jury’s verdict was unanimous. It also strongly endorsed the coroner’s nine recommendations, including a recommendation to the Medical Council to “lay out exactly when a doctor can intervene to save the life of the mother in similar circumstances, which will remove doubt and fear from the doctor and also reassure the public”.The coroner and the legal team for Galway University Hospital clarified that the medical misadventure is not cause of death nor a contributory cause of death.“The verdict of misadventure does not mean that system failure or deficiencies contributed to her death,” explained Dr Ciarán McLoughlin.Tony Canavan, spokesperson for the hospital group, expressed his sympathies to Praveen and his family, noting that the nine recommendations of the inquest would be taken on board at the hospital.He said it has been “difficult” for the staff and hospital to be in the spotlight but said public accountability helps provide a better environment for patients. He wanted to reassure the public that a range of improvements had already been implemented at the hospital, including early warning systems about sepsis shock and improved communications.Speaking after the hearing, Mr Halappanavar’s solicitor Gerard O’Donnell said “in his opinion, Savita Halappanavar had been deprived of her constitutional right to life, her right to be treated in a hospital”. “There has been a significant breach of human rights,” he added.He described “an extremely worrying” situation for women in Ireland who “must wait until they are gravely ill” before there can be intervention.He urged the government to review the coroner’s recommendations as a matter of urgency “to ensure this doesn’t happen again”.Over the past two weeks, the inquest heard from 36 witnesses, including hospital staff, medical experts and Praveen Halappanavar himself. Evidence indicated that had a termination been provided to expedite the miscarriage, Savita Halappanavar would probably be alive today.Savita inquest: Jury returns verdict of medical misadventureSavita inquest: The coroner’s nine recommendations endorsed by the jurylast_img read more

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