Will Leather Goods Opens Detroit Location

first_img Learn Guitar (and Don’t Give Up) With the Fender Play App How to Transition Your Wardrobe to Fall In the early ‘80s, you could find Will Adler, the founder of Will Leather Goods, selling leather belts from a small stand on the Venice Beach boardwalk. Adler moved to Eugene, Oregon and founded Will Leather Goods, a lifestyle brand inspired by his surroundings in Oregon. Fast forward to 2016. Will Leather Goods expanded to produce more than just belts. Now, it carries wallets, bags, purses, beanies, scarves and more, with eight locations, including a flagship store in Venice Beach, four Oregon locations in Eugene and Portland, one in New York and San Francisco, and the newest location in Detroit.The opening marks the brand’s first location in the midwest. Will Leather Goods took the space that was formerly the historic Tomboy grocery store, embracing the city’s DIY ethos and creative culture, and turned it into a concept store that features a coffee shop and an art gallery. As is the tradition in Detroit, the materials for the building were sourced from the city’s endless supply abandoned buildings. The vintage signage, light fixtures, bathroom stalls, floors and came from salvaged buildings, and the coffee shop is even made entirely from recovered materials from a historic Detroit firehouse. Designed by Birmingham, Michigan-based architects, McIntosh Poris Associates, along with William Adler Design, the 9,000-square-foot space, located on 4120 2nd Avenue, is among the newest stores in the city’s Midtown. They worked with Architectural Salvage Warehouse of Detroit to source the reclaimed materials. The gallery space, which opened with a series of photographs by Robert Shaw titled,  “American Heroes and Dreamers,”  will feature work that highlights the history of both Detroit and the United States. To mark the occasion, the company donated 4000 backpacks to Cornerstone Schools’ students as part of the company’s Give Will program, founded on the belief that every child deserves a bag to carry their dreams.The location is particularly special to Adler, because he was born in Northwest Detroit. “I am proud and humbled to be returning to Detroit, to the city that made me who I am today, and to be able to share the quality, passion and integrity that the Will Leather Goods brand represents with the people of Detroit,” said Adler.  “We look forward to much success in our newest location, but just knowing that Will Leather Goods is playing a small part in the rebirth and growth of Midtown, and that we’re helping some very deserving students, is a reward onto itself.”For more information, visit willleathergoods.com. Your New Favorite Pair of Go-to Leather Shoes Just Got More Affordable Editors’ Recommendations Banksy’s Gross Domestic Product Is a Pop-Up Shop Unlike Any Other Live Out Your Westworld Dreams at Casteel Creek Retreatlast_img read more

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Threeperson Team to Review Special Education Programming

first_imgTwo retired educators and an education professor have been named to a three-member team to look at whether special education programming and services are achieving their desired results. The review will also consider the impact of special education programming and services on children in the school system in Nova Scotia. The review may include but not be limited to such topics as teacher education, transition planning for 18-21-year-olds, inclusionary practices, integrated services and programming support as well as others that may be identified by the review committee in the coming weeks. “We want to ensure that each student is receiving a quality education,” said Education Minister Karen Casey. “This review team will identify our successes and where we can do more.” Walter Farmer, a retired school administrator from Enfield, Hants Co.; Miles MacDonald, a retired school principal from Guysborough; and Lynn Aylward, a professor with Acadia University’s education faculty, Wolfville, Kings Co., will form the committee. Together, they have a broad range of classroom, student services and administrative experience. The review will provide an opportunity for parents, educators, school board members and staff, school advisory council chairpersons and advocacy organizations to share their thoughts on special education programming and services. Dates, times and locations of these forums will be announced soon. In addition to the forums, interested parties can send written submissions to the Department of Education or comment through the department’s website. Contact information and a specific web address will be included with the announcement of the forum schedule. A final report, with recommendations, is expected by the summer. The three team members will be supported by an advisory committee of six representatives from prominent advocacy groups. All six people are members of the Special Education Program Services committee, which meets regularly with Department of Education officials. The advisory committee will be Ron Brunton, Nova Scotia Teachers Union; Mary Jess MacDonald, Nova Scotia School Boards Association; Annie Baert, Learning Disabilities Association of Nova Scotia; Mary Rothman, Nova Scotia Association for Community Living; Patricia Murray, Department of Health, children’s services; and Vicki Harvey, Autism Society of Nova Scotia. “Nova Scotia released its special education policy in 1996 and the department has worked closely with educators, parents, students and advocates to establish programming that helps students with special needs to succeed,” said Ms. Casey. This policy, supported by the Education Act and the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, guides school boards in the development of educational programming for students with special needs. As in the other provinces across Canada, Nova Scotia supports inclusive learning for all students. In May 2000, the education minister established the Special Education Implementation Review Committee to report on the roll-out of the province’s special education policy. The committee reported back to the minister in June 2001, making 34 recommendations to address challenges that had been identified. All 34 report recommendations have been acted upon. About one in five students needs additional help at some time in their public school experience. This can range from a one-time assessment interview to ongoing support for students with long-term medical or health needs. The Department of Education is investing $118 million in formula funding this year to support students with special needs. Since 2003-04, almost 175 resource teachers, speech language pathologists, school psychologists and other education professionals have been hired in the public school system.last_img read more

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